AR banner
Back to Top
Allied Air Forces Losses and Incidents Database.

Including 6700+ USAAF Claims

Search Tips •  Researching Your Loved OneContact us via Helpdesk for research on your loved one  • Names in DatabaseThese are all the names in the database
Data derived from many sources. Corrections/Additions welcomed via Helpdesk
This database consolidates all data previously held in our Fighter Command and Bomber Command databases and that held in our Polish Honour Roll database

* NOTE ON DATES: IMPORTANT: For consistency, the Date is given as the date the mission TOOK OFF since the precise time of a loss is not always certain. Our date is always the Take Off date as this is unambigous and fixed in the official records, but obviously in those cases where the incident occurred before midnight UK time, then the Take Off Date will be the same as the Incident Date. Of course, most Bomber Command missions flew through midnight, therefore a Luftwaffe claim against a plane - or a locally generated crash report - may record the incident as occurring on the day following our Take Off Date. Bear this in mind when cross-referencing to our Luftwaffe Victories by Name/Date Database and other Luftwaffe sources. In some cases other sources may quote the date following our date, using locally generated reports as their source. (Earlier readers may remember we stated our date was the Briefing Date, but it is in fact the TAKE OFF date). To add to the potential for confusion, remember to take into account a Luftwaffe recorded date will be in local time, 1 hour ahead of UK time. When we discover a validated Incident Date date we change our record if necessary

Thanks to Personnel of the Polish Air Force in Great Britain for supplementary data and images (marked with a chequerboard device) related to the Polish Air Force, and many images courtesy of our respected colleagues Wojtek Matusiak and Robert Gretzyngier. Other images from our own archives.
Responding to requests that respects may be paid in this database to a loved one or friend, or someone you want to recognize, an In Memoriam plaque may now be placed next to any entry. See our Donate Page for details. Search for In Memoriam in this database to see examples of plaques which have been placed.

Polish Air Force personnel have a supplementary database containing more information and many more entries. Check the following:
Personel Polskich Sił Powietrznych posiada dodatkową bazę danych zawierającą więcej informacji i wiele innych wpisów. Sprawdź następujące elementy:
Archiwum: PSP 1939 -1947 Database 17,000+ Polish Air Force Entries
ON REQUEST, MORE INFORMATION CAN OFTEN BE RETRIEVED FROM OUR RESEARCH ARCHIVE ON EVERY ENTRY, AND ON NAMES YET TO BE ENTERED.

You can now search on a minimum of 2 characters (previous minimum was 3). To search for single character squadrons such as 5, append Sqd, thus search for 5 Sqd

See a sample search
If you would like our team to research a family member or friend who appears in this database, contact us via the Helpdesk. We will send you instructions.


Enter Your search conditions and click Search This

These are the results of your search:

You searched for: “LV898

#Name* (↑)First NamesTitleRankRAF Equivalent RankService No.BornNationalityRoleAwardsAir Force (↑)Command (↑)Unit (↑)DateofIncident *See Note (↑)Aircraft (↑)TypeSerialCodeVictories (Fighters)BaseTimeMission                        Incident                        FateCommemoratedPhoto (Click to Expand)Referring DatabaseLinks/Archive Reports                        Notes                        
1 BissettJack MontgomerySquadron LeaderJ/16991CanadaPilotDFM

MiD

RCAFBomber Command427 Sqd RCAF
1944-03-30HalifaxIIILV898ZL-DLeeming2220NurnbergShot down by a night fighter and crashed over Herhahn whilst on a bombing raid to Nuremberg. Crashed HerhohnKilled Age 23Rheinberg War Cemetery 14. E. 8.
Personnel date on Paradie RCAF ArchiveHalifax LV898, piloted by Squadron Leader J. M. Bissett, DFM was detailed to attack Nuremberg, as part of the main force of 795 aircraft, and was shot down by an enemy night-fighter and crashed at Herhahn, 4km north west of Schleiden, on 30-31 March 1944. All the crew were killed.

The raid on Nuremberg on the night of 30-31 March 1944 was the blackest night for Bomber Command in the whole of the War, with some 96 aircraft lost. 'The Bomber Command War Diaries' by Martin Middlebrook gives the following account: ‘This would normally have been the moon and stand down period for the main bomber force but a raid on the distant target of Nuremberg (8 hours round trip) was planned on the basis of a forecast predicting protective high cloud on the outward route. 795 aircraft were despatched. The German Controller ignored all diversions and assembled his fighters at 2 radio beacons which happened to be astride the route to Nuremberg. The first night fighters appeared just before the bombers reached the Belgian border and a fierce battle in the moonlight lasted for the next hour. 82 bombers were lost on the outward route. The action was much reduced on the return flight, when most of the night fighters had had to land but 96 bombers were lost in total, the largest Bomber Command loss of the war. The main raid over Nuremberg was a failure, the city was covered in thick cloud and a fierce cross wind which developed on the final target approach made the Pathfinder aircraft move too far to the East, little damage was caused. Subsequent research showed that 120 aircraft had bombed Schweinfurt, 50 miles to the North West of Nuremberg and that there had been a 10 mile ‘creep back’ in the main bombing.’ Three Halifax’s from 427 Squadron were lost in the raid with only two crew members surviving. 'The Nuremberg Raid' by Martin Middlebrook gives additional information onLV898: ‘At least nine flight commanders went missing, all killed. 427 Sqd lost both A and B flight commanders- Squadron Leader’s Bissett, DFM, and Laird, DFC both Manitobans. Bissett’s crew had already caused anxiety on the squadron when starting their second tour by their apparent unconcern at the importance of keeping on course and his loss was not unexpected. In fact, Bissett’s Halifax had crashed almost exactly on track south of Aachen.’
2 HallWilliam ChurchillPilot OfficerJ/89730CanadaAir Gunner (mid upper)RCAFBomber Command427 Sqd RCAF
1944-03-30HalifaxIIILV898ZL-DLeeming2220Nurnberg Shot down by a night fighter and crashed over Herhahn whilst on a bombing raid to Nuremberg. Crashed Herhohn KilledRheinberg War Cemetery 14. E. 1. Paradie Archive Database Halifax LV898, piloted by Squadron Leader J. M. Bissett, DFM was detailed to attack Nuremberg, as part of the main force of 795 aircraft, and was shot down by an enemy night-fighter and crashed at Herhahn, 4km north west of Schleiden, on 30-31 March 1944. All the crew were killed.

The raid on Nuremberg on the night of 30-31 March 1944 was the blackest night for Bomber Command in the whole of the War, with some 96 aircraft lost. 'The Bomber Command War Diaries' by Martin Middlebrook gives the following account: ‘This would normally have been the moon and stand down period for the main bomber force but a raid on the distant target of Nuremberg (8 hours round trip) was planned on the basis of a forecast predicting protective high cloud on the outward route. 795 aircraft were despatched. The German Controller ignored all diversions and assembled his fighters at 2 radio beacons which happened to be astride the route to Nuremberg. The first night fighters appeared just before the bombers reached the Belgian border and a fierce battle in the moonlight lasted for the next hour. 82 bombers were lost on the outward route. The action was much reduced on the return flight, when most of the night fighters had had to land but 96 bombers were lost in total, the largest Bomber Command loss of the war. The main raid over Nuremberg was a failure, the city was covered in thick cloud and a fierce cross wind which developed on the final target approach made the Pathfinder aircraft move too far to the East, little damage was caused. Subsequent research showed that 120 aircraft had bombed Schweinfurt, 50 miles to the North West of Nuremberg and that there had been a 10 mile ‘creep back’ in the main bombing.’ Three Halifax’s from 427 Squadron were lost in the raid with only two crew members surviving. 'The Nuremberg Raid' by Martin Middlebrook gives additional information onLV898: ‘At least nine flight commanders went missing, all killed. 427 Sqd lost both A and B flight commanders- Squadron Leader’s Bissett, DFM, and Laird, DFC both Manitobans. Bissett’s crew had already caused anxiety on the squadron when starting their second tour by their apparent unconcern at the importance of keeping on course and his loss was not unexpected. In fact, Bissett’s Halifax had crashed almost exactly on track south of Aachen.’
3 HollowayVincent SydneySergeant1891437Flight Engineer1939-45 Star; Air Crew Europe Star; War Medal 1939-45RAFVRBomber Command427 Sqd RCAF (Lion Squadron)
1944-03-30HalifaxIIILV898ZL-DLeeming2220Nurnberg Shot down by a night fighter and crashed over Herhahn whilst on a bombing raid to Nuremberg. Crashed Herhohn Killed Age 31Rheinberg War Cemetery 14. E. 7.
Flight Engineer with 427 Sqd RCAF (Lion Squadron). He joined an immensely experienced and decorated crew, most of whom were on their second operational tour, with four of his crew having been awarded the DFM with 78 Squadron. His first operational sortie was to Frankfurt on 22 March 1944, a raid that effectively ended the city’s existence, and he followed this up with a raid on the ‘Big City’, Berlin on 24 March. This raid, known as ‘The Night of the Strong Winds’ was a catastrophic failure for Bomber Command and the last raid on Berlin. Holloway was killed in action when Halifax LV898, piloted by Squadron Leader J. M. Bissett, DFM was detailed to attack Nuremberg, as part of the main force of 795 aircraft, and was shot down by an enemy night-fighter and crashed at Herhahn, 4km north west of Schleiden, on 30-31 March 1944. All the crew were killed. The raid on Nuremberg on the night of 30-31 March 1944 was the blackest night for Bomber Command in the whole of the War, with some 96 aircraft lost. The Bomber Command War Diaries by Martin Middlebrook gives the following account: ‘This would normally have been the moon and stand down period for the main bomber force but a raid on the distant target of Nuremberg (8 hours round trip) was planned on the basis of a forecast predicting protective high cloud on the outward route. 795 aircraft were despatched. The German Controller ignored all diversions and assembled his fighters at 2 radio beacons which happened to be astride the route to Nuremberg. The first night fighters appeared just before the bombers reached the Belgian border and a fierce battle in the moonlight lasted for the next hour. 82 bombers were lost on the outward route. The action was much reduced on the return flight, when most of the night fighters had had to land but 96 bombers were lost in total, the largest Bomber Command loss of the war. The main raid over Nuremberg was a failure, the city was covered in thick cloud and a fierce cross wind which developed on the final target approach made the Pathfinder aircraft move too far to the East, little damage was caused. Subsequent research showed that 120 aircraft had bombed Schweinfurt, 50 miles to the North West of Nuremberg and that there had been a 10 mile ‘creep back’ in the main bombing.’ Three Halifax’s from 427 Squadron were lost in the raid with only two crew members surviving. 'The Nuremberg Raid' by Martin Middlebrook gives additional information on Holloway’s aircraft: ‘At least nine flight commanders went missing, all killed. 427 Sqd lost both A and B flight commanders- Squadron Leader’s Bissett, DFM, and Laird, DFC both Manitobans. Bissett’s crew had already caused anxiety on the squadron when starting their second tour by their apparent unconcern at the importance of keeping on course and his loss was not unexpected. In fact, Bissett’s Halifax had crashed almost exactly on track south of Aachen.’ Holloway is buried along with his crew in Rheinberg War Cemetery, Germany. His medals were sent to his mother, Mrs. Maude Louise Holloway. Mena, 8 Queens Rod, Slough, Bucks
4 LeclaireJoseph Jacques H. GuyFlying OfficerJ/16096CanadaWireless Op/Air GunnerRCAFBomber Command427 Sqd RCAF
1944-03-30HalifaxIIILV898ZL-DLeeming2220NurnbergShot down by a night fighter and crashed over Herhahn whilst on a bombing raid to Nuremberg. Crashed HerhohnKilled Age 26Rheinberg War Cemetery 14. E. 5. Paradie Archive Database Halifax LV898, piloted by Squadron Leader J. M. Bissett, DFM was detailed to attack Nuremberg, as part of the main force of 795 aircraft, and was shot down by an enemy night-fighter and crashed at Herhahn, 4km north west of Schleiden, on 30-31 March 1944. All the crew were killed.

The raid on Nuremberg on the night of 30-31 March 1944 was the blackest night for Bomber Command in the whole of the War, with some 96 aircraft lost. 'The Bomber Command War Diaries' by Martin Middlebrook gives the following account: ‘This would normally have been the moon and stand down period for the main bomber force but a raid on the distant target of Nuremberg (8 hours round trip) was planned on the basis of a forecast predicting protective high cloud on the outward route. 795 aircraft were despatched. The German Controller ignored all diversions and assembled his fighters at 2 radio beacons which happened to be astride the route to Nuremberg. The first night fighters appeared just before the bombers reached the Belgian border and a fierce battle in the moonlight lasted for the next hour. 82 bombers were lost on the outward route. The action was much reduced on the return flight, when most of the night fighters had had to land but 96 bombers were lost in total, the largest Bomber Command loss of the war. The main raid over Nuremberg was a failure, the city was covered in thick cloud and a fierce cross wind which developed on the final target approach made the Pathfinder aircraft move too far to the East, little damage was caused. Subsequent research showed that 120 aircraft had bombed Schweinfurt, 50 miles to the North West of Nuremberg and that there had been a 10 mile ‘creep back’ in the main bombing.’ Three Halifax’s from 427 Squadron were lost in the raid with only two crew members surviving. 'The Nuremberg Raid' by Martin Middlebrook gives additional information onLV898: ‘At least nine flight commanders went missing, all killed. 427 Sqd lost both A and B flight commanders- Squadron Leader’s Bissett, DFM, and Laird, DFC both Manitobans. Bissett’s crew had already caused anxiety on the squadron when starting their second tour by their apparent unconcern at the importance of keeping on course and his loss was not unexpected. In fact, Bissett’s Halifax had crashed almost exactly on track south of Aachen.’
5 ShannonRobert AlfredFlying OfficerJ/18167CanadaAir Gunner (rear)DFM

RCAFBomber Command427 Sqd RCAF
1944-03-30HalifaxIIILV898ZL-DLeeming2220Nurnberg Shot down by a night fighter and crashed over Herhahn whilst on a bombing raid to Nuremberg. Crashed Herhohn Killed Age 21Rheinberg War Cemetery 14. E. 2.
Paradie Archive Database Halifax LV898, piloted by Squadron Leader J. M. Bissett, DFM was detailed to attack Nuremberg, as part of the main force of 795 aircraft, and was shot down by an enemy night-fighter and crashed at Herhahn, 4km north west of Schleiden, on 30-31 March 1944. All the crew were killed.

The raid on Nuremberg on the night of 30-31 March 1944 was the blackest night for Bomber Command in the whole of the War, with some 96 aircraft lost. 'The Bomber Command War Diaries' by Martin Middlebrook gives the following account: ‘This would normally have been the moon and stand down period for the main bomber force but a raid on the distant target of Nuremberg (8 hours round trip) was planned on the basis of a forecast predicting protective high cloud on the outward route. 795 aircraft were despatched. The German Controller ignored all diversions and assembled his fighters at 2 radio beacons which happened to be astride the route to Nuremberg. The first night fighters appeared just before the bombers reached the Belgian border and a fierce battle in the moonlight lasted for the next hour. 82 bombers were lost on the outward route. The action was much reduced on the return flight, when most of the night fighters had had to land but 96 bombers were lost in total, the largest Bomber Command loss of the war. The main raid over Nuremberg was a failure, the city was covered in thick cloud and a fierce cross wind which developed on the final target approach made the Pathfinder aircraft move too far to the East, little damage was caused. Subsequent research showed that 120 aircraft had bombed Schweinfurt, 50 miles to the North West of Nuremberg and that there had been a 10 mile ‘creep back’ in the main bombing.’ Three Halifax’s from 427 Squadron were lost in the raid with only two crew members surviving. 'The Nuremberg Raid' by Martin Middlebrook gives additional information onLV898: ‘At least nine flight commanders went missing, all killed. 427 Sqd lost both A and B flight commanders- Squadron Leader’s Bissett, DFM, and Laird, DFC both Manitobans. Bissett’s crew had already caused anxiety on the squadron when starting their second tour by their apparent unconcern at the importance of keeping on course and his loss was not unexpected. In fact, Bissett’s Halifax had crashed almost exactly on track south of Aachen.’
6 ShoenerKenneth FrankFlight Sergeant / Warrant Officer Class IIR/144198CanadaCo PilotRCAFBomber Command427 Sqd RCAF
1944-03-30HalifaxIIILV898ZL-DLeeming2220Nurnberg Shot down by a night fighter and crashed over Herhahn whilst on a bombing raid to Nuremberg. Crashed Herhohn KilledRheinberg War Cemetery 14. E. 3.
Paradie Archive Database Halifax LV898, piloted by Squadron Leader J. M. Bissett, DFM was detailed to attack Nuremberg, as part of the main force of 795 aircraft, and was shot down by an enemy night-fighter and crashed at Herhahn, 4km north west of Schleiden, on 30-31 March 1944. All the crew were killed.

The raid on Nuremberg on the night of 30-31 March 1944 was the blackest night for Bomber Command in the whole of the War, with some 96 aircraft lost. 'The Bomber Command War Diaries' by Martin Middlebrook gives the following account: ‘This would normally have been the moon and stand down period for the main bomber force but a raid on the distant target of Nuremberg (8 hours round trip) was planned on the basis of a forecast predicting protective high cloud on the outward route. 795 aircraft were despatched. The German Controller ignored all diversions and assembled his fighters at 2 radio beacons which happened to be astride the route to Nuremberg. The first night fighters appeared just before the bombers reached the Belgian border and a fierce battle in the moonlight lasted for the next hour. 82 bombers were lost on the outward route. The action was much reduced on the return flight, when most of the night fighters had had to land but 96 bombers were lost in total, the largest Bomber Command loss of the war. The main raid over Nuremberg was a failure, the city was covered in thick cloud and a fierce cross wind which developed on the final target approach made the Pathfinder aircraft move too far to the East, little damage was caused. Subsequent research showed that 120 aircraft had bombed Schweinfurt, 50 miles to the North West of Nuremberg and that there had been a 10 mile ‘creep back’ in the main bombing.’ Three Halifax’s from 427 Squadron were lost in the raid with only two crew members surviving. 'The Nuremberg Raid' by Martin Middlebrook gives additional information onLV898: ‘At least nine flight commanders went missing, all killed. 427 Sqd lost both A and B flight commanders- Squadron Leader’s Bissett, DFM, and Laird, DFC both Manitobans. Bissett’s crew had already caused anxiety on the squadron when starting their second tour by their apparent unconcern at the importance of keeping on course and his loss was not unexpected. In fact, Bissett’s Halifax had crashed almost exactly on track south of Aachen.’
7 WhiteRobert JohnFlying OfficerJ/17506CanadaNavigatorDFM

RCAFBomber Command427 Sqd RCAF
1944-03-30HalifaxIIILV898ZL-DLeeming2220Nurnberg Shot down by a night fighter and crashed over Herhahn whilst on a bombing raid to Nuremberg. Crashed Herhohn Killed Age 26Rheinberg War Cemetery
Paradie Archive Database Halifax LV898, piloted by Squadron Leader J. M. Bissett, DFM was detailed to attack Nuremberg, as part of the main force of 795 aircraft, and was shot down by an enemy night-fighter and crashed at Herhahn, 4km north west of Schleiden, on 30-31 March 1944. All the crew were killed.

The raid on Nuremberg on the night of 30-31 March 1944 was the blackest night for Bomber Command in the whole of the War, with some 96 aircraft lost. 'The Bomber Command War Diaries' by Martin Middlebrook gives the following account: ‘This would normally have been the moon and stand down period for the main bomber force but a raid on the distant target of Nuremberg (8 hours round trip) was planned on the basis of a forecast predicting protective high cloud on the outward route. 795 aircraft were despatched. The German Controller ignored all diversions and assembled his fighters at 2 radio beacons which happened to be astride the route to Nuremberg. The first night fighters appeared just before the bombers reached the Belgian border and a fierce battle in the moonlight lasted for the next hour. 82 bombers were lost on the outward route. The action was much reduced on the return flight, when most of the night fighters had had to land but 96 bombers were lost in total, the largest Bomber Command loss of the war. The main raid over Nuremberg was a failure, the city was covered in thick cloud and a fierce cross wind which developed on the final target approach made the Pathfinder aircraft move too far to the East, little damage was caused. Subsequent research showed that 120 aircraft had bombed Schweinfurt, 50 miles to the North West of Nuremberg and that there had been a 10 mile ‘creep back’ in the main bombing.’ Three Halifax’s from 427 Squadron were lost in the raid with only two crew members surviving. 'The Nuremberg Raid' by Martin Middlebrook gives additional information onLV898: ‘At least nine flight commanders went missing, all killed. 427 Sqd lost both A and B flight commanders- Squadron Leader’s Bissett, DFM, and Laird, DFC both Manitobans. Bissett’s crew had already caused anxiety on the squadron when starting their second tour by their apparent unconcern at the importance of keeping on course and his loss was not unexpected. In fact, Bissett’s Halifax had crashed almost exactly on track south of Aachen.’
8 ZulaufFranklin RoyFlying OfficerJ/17205CanadaBomb AimerDFM

RCAFBomber Command427 Sqd RCAF
1944-03-30HalifaxIIILV898ZL-DLeeming2220Nurnberg Shot down by a night fighter and crashed over Herhahn whilst on a bombing raid to Nuremberg. Crashed Herhohn KilledRheinberg War Cemetery 14. E. 6.
Personnal date on Paradie RCAF Archive Halifax LV898, piloted by Squadron Leader J. M. Bissett, DFM was detailed to attack Nuremberg, as part of the main force of 795 aircraft, and was shot down by an enemy night-fighter and crashed at Herhahn, 4km north west of Schleiden, on 30-31 March 1944. All the crew were killed.

The raid on Nuremberg on the night of 30-31 March 1944 was the blackest night for Bomber Command in the whole of the War, with some 96 aircraft lost. 'The Bomber Command War Diaries' by Martin Middlebrook gives the following account: ‘This would normally have been the moon and stand down period for the main bomber force but a raid on the distant target of Nuremberg (8 hours round trip) was planned on the basis of a forecast predicting protective high cloud on the outward route. 795 aircraft were despatched. The German Controller ignored all diversions and assembled his fighters at 2 radio beacons which happened to be astride the route to Nuremberg. The first night fighters appeared just before the bombers reached the Belgian border and a fierce battle in the moonlight lasted for the next hour. 82 bombers were lost on the outward route. The action was much reduced on the return flight, when most of the night fighters had had to land but 96 bombers were lost in total, the largest Bomber Command loss of the war. The main raid over Nuremberg was a failure, the city was covered in thick cloud and a fierce cross wind which developed on the final target approach made the Pathfinder aircraft move too far to the East, little damage was caused. Subsequent research showed that 120 aircraft had bombed Schweinfurt, 50 miles to the North West of Nuremberg and that there had been a 10 mile ‘creep back’ in the main bombing.’ Three Halifax’s from 427 Squadron were lost in the raid with only two crew members surviving. 'The Nuremberg Raid' by Martin Middlebrook gives additional information onLV898: ‘At least nine flight commanders went missing, all killed. 427 Sqd lost both A and B flight commanders- Squadron Leader’s Bissett, DFM, and Laird, DFC both Manitobans. Bissett’s crew had already caused anxiety on the squadron when starting their second tour by their apparent unconcern at the importance of keeping on course and his loss was not unexpected. In fact, Bissett’s Halifax had crashed almost exactly on track south of Aachen.’

Results 1 to 8 of 8.