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Nordic Air Forces Losses and Incidents Database
Participants from Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland Operating Within RAF Structures

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This is believed to be the most comprehensive database of Nordic activities. If you have more information, please contact us via the Helpdesk.
Data derived from many sources: particular thanks go to the extraordinary site Våre Falne - de Norske Ofrene (Our Fallen - the Norwegian Victims).
Corrections/Additions welcomed via Helpdesk


Norway contributed 4 entire squadrons to the cause, operating under Norwegian officers within the overall structure of the RAF. These were: 330 Sqd (Coastal Command), 331 Sqd (Fighter Command), 332 Sqd (Fighter Command), 333 Sqd (Coastal Command). Additionally, a number of Norwegians fought as members of RAF squadrons.

More than 250 Danish men and women fought with Allied air forces. There were no dedicated Danish squadrons. Many fought within Norwegian squadrons, others were part of RAF squadrons. The definitive account of Danish air activities is in Mikkel Planthin's book 'Britain's Victory, Denmark's Freedom'.

Sweden remained neutral throughout the war but many Swedish individuals could not sit idly by whilst Germany rampaged across Europe and volunteered to fight with the Allies. Some flew within Norwegian squadrons, others as part of RAF squadrons.
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The German occupation of Norway began when they invaded the neutral country on 9 May 1940, and the country remained under Wehrmacht rule until 8 May 1945. The government and King Haakon VII had escaped and formed a government in exile in London, whilst their home country was ruled by the ‘puppet’ government of Vidkun Quisling. Many Norwegians fought in the resistance or as part of the Free Norwegian Forces, including the establishment of the Royal Norwegian Air Force in 1944. The fortitude and bravery of the Norwegian people is surely exemplified by the struggles hundreds of intrepid, detemined souls endured to escape and find their way to the Island of Last Hope where they could continue the fight against their homeland's occupiers. We salute the bravery of Norway's finest! Germany's hold on the country was prised from its brutal fist on 8 May 1945 and five days later Crown Prince Olav and five government ministers returned. The rest of the royal family returned on 7 June 1945, five years to the day since the King and Queen had been forced to leave.

A prime source for some of the material in this database is the extraordinary site Våre Falne - de Norske Ofrene (Our Fallen - the Norwegian Victims). This unique memorial effort attempts to capture the story of every Norwegian who died during the German occupation - every man, woman and child. We thank them for permission to use selected extracts from their material.
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#Name* (↑)First NamesTitleRankRAF Equivalent RankService No.BornNationalityRoleAwardsAir Force (↑)Command (↑)Unit (↑)DateofIncident *See Note (↑)Aircraft (↑)TypeSerialCodeVictories (Fighters)BaseTimeMission                        Incident                        FateCommemoratedPhoto (Click to Expand)Referring Database                        Notes                        Links/Archive Reports
1 Holdø Hans Olai Ltn.June 7, 1921 in HadselNorwayPilotRNoAFCoastal Support333 Sqd Norwegian

1943-08-28MOSQUITOVIDZ745JLeuchars13:14 - 16:12Patrol Shipping RecceFailed To Return GERMAN A/C, NORWAY IV. / JG 5, Crash area unknown, off the , Norwegian coast.Killed
HOLDØ, HANS OLAI, lieutenant, Hadsel. By Lauritz Berg Holdø and Ragna Helene b. Olsen. Middle school. Traveled as a sailor with d / s Hellen, enlisted in America in 1940 and enlisted in the Navy Air Force. Served in Iceland and was later transferred to Scotland. Fell in battle off the Norwegian coast 28 August 1943. Mentioned in Reed-Olsen: 'We will come again', p. 222. The brothers Lauritz and Theodor also died during the war.

Mosquito DZ745: Took off for shipping reconnaissance off Norway. 28/08/1943 Missing. Shot down by FW190 at 16:12 hrs JAGDGRUPPE IV./JG 5 German pilot was Fw. Paul Schalk (1) from IV./JG 5, who claimed 1 Mosquito at 16:12 off Norway, Pl.Qu.06-Ost-4275.
2 WestlyErik LeifManila, PhiliipinesPilotDFC
Fighter Command332 Sqd Norwegian

Spitfire
January 1943 saw the enemy attempting a major low attack on the south coast of England between Dover and Dungeness. Both Norwegian squadrons were sent up to meet them. Erik Leif Westly and Nils Fuglesang (332) got into a dogfight, and Westly got a FW 190 probable and Fuglesang one damaged. Enemy repulsed.

332 Sqd veterans Jon Ryg and Eric Westly, here at North Weald with fresh DFC medals on their chests. Ryg became Wing Commander of 132 Wing when Rolf Arne Berg was killed in 1945, and held this position until the end of the hostilities. He passed away in 2005 at the age of 90. Westly was born in Manila, Philipines and joined the Norwegian effort at Little Norway in Canada late in 1940. He often wore a wig as he had contracted a disease as a child which left him bald. He survived the war.
3 WeisteenTarald29/07/1916 Hønefoss, NorwayNorwayPilotDFC & Bar

St. Olav's Medal With Oak Branch

Krigsmedaljen

Deltagermedaljen

King Haakon's 70th Anniversary Medal

RNoAFFighter Command331 Sqd Norwegian

85 Sqd

SpitfireDied 2009


Tarald Weisteen son of Einar Weisteen and Margit Løvstad. He married in 1945 Anne Margrete Rørholt, sister of his fellow student from the War School, Bjørn Rørholt. Education from the machine line at NTH, before he started at the Flying School in 1938, where he received his wings in 1939. In March 1940, he started at the War School. He participated in the fighting in Norway in the April days of 1940, before returning to NTH. After a period of resistance work in Trondheim, he was told that he was under the supervision of the Germans, and came over to Canada. In the autumn of 1941, he traveled with others who had been educated at Little Norway on the ship 'Aquitania' from Halifax to Great Britain for active service. He was first a pilot in 331 Sqd on Spitfires. In 1943 he ended up in a British night fighter squadron, 85 Sqd, where he flew Mosquito. After the war, Weisteen continued his military career, first as squadron commander of 332 Sqd at Værnes Airport. He graduated from the Royal Air Force Staff College in 1950–51 and from the Norwegian Defense College in 1959. He served as commander at 334 Sqd(1948), at Værnes Airport (1953) and at the Air Force's station Reitan (1963). In 1956 he was at SHAPE in Paris. In 1971 he became chief of the operations staff at the Armed Forces' High Command Southern Norway, where he also ended his career in the Air Force in 1981. He was a colonel from 1963, and in 1970-1972 he was chief adjutant to the King.

Norwegian 331 Squadron pilots in November 1942. On top: Johannes Greiner, Martin Gran. Second row, l-r: Helge Sognnæs (died 1943), Leif Lundsten (d. 1944), Stein Sem (d. 1942), Knut Bache (d. 1944), Anton C. Hagerup (d. 1943), Rolf Arne Berg (d. 1945), the Squadron's Intelligence Officer Philip Yatman, Rolf Engelsen and Svein Heglund. Bottom: Reidar Haave Olsen (d. 1944), Kristian Nyerrød, Fredrik Fearnley (d. 1944) with Varg, Kaj Birksted from Denmark and Tarald Weisteen.



331 sqd and later Mosquito nightfighter pilot Tarald Weisteen, here photographed in 1945 on what I presume is his wedding day, alongside his longtime girlfriend and now bride Anne Margrete Rørholt.

He was biographed by Gato Guhnfeldt in 2004, in the book Nattjager


Weisteen's Spitfire
4 von KroghEilif Christian & Fnr.2912 November 1915 in Stavanger,NorwayRNoAFCoastal Command330 Sqd Norwegian

1942-09-17NORTHROP N-3PB303GS-NBúðareyri (Budareyri) Iceland05:45 - 06:50Anti Submarine SweepCat E Accident, ICELAND Weather, Crash into hill at peninsula , Vattarnes, near Búðareyri (Budareyri) Iceland KilledFossvogur, Iceland


Fossvogur, Iceland
KROGH, EILIF CHRISTIAN VON, flyfenrik, Stavanger. Born 12 November 1915 in Stavanger, p. By Christian Krogh, b. 1875 in Stavanger, and Inger Sofie b. Berg, b. 1888 in Avaldsnes. Married to Gerd Thorkildsen, born 1914 in Horten. School ship course, Naval Corps, 2 p.m. radiotelegraph certificate. Served during the war in Norway in 1940 on the Navy's patrol ship m / s Syrian. Went from Svolvær on 11 June last year and came via Iceland to England and enlisted in the air force. After graduating as a navigator in Little Norway, Canada, he was stationed in Iceland. During a patrol flight, the plane went up a mountain, and he died on September 17, 1942. Buried in Reykjavik.

Floatplane together with GS-U had just started on a A/S Sweep when they were suprised with thick FOG. They then were ordered back to base, however floatplane later crashed into hill in still bad weather. The whole crew is buried at Fossvoguer Kirkegard, Reykjavik in Iceland.
5 Unknown Norwegian pilotPilotRNoAFFighter Command332 Sqd Norwegian

1944-03-29SPITFIRELF.IXMH854North WealdCat E Accident, BRITAIN Engine, Forced landing Standford River, EssexSafe332 Sqd no operational flying12 March- 31 March 1944. Last pilot on MH854 was T. Hetland on 11 March 1944 on Ramrod 847, wing led by Mjr Berg. No activity.

Aircraft had engine cut on take off

33MU 1-10-43 317S 11-10-43 332S engine failed after takeoff force-landed Stanford River Essex CE 29-3-44
6 Sognnaes (Sognnæs)Helge SigurdsonLtn.N1061920-09-20 BergenNorwayPilotDFC

St. Olav's Medal with Oak Branch
RNoAFFighter Command331 Sqd Norwegian

1943-06-22SPITFIRELF.IXAB457FN-D6North Weald7:42Ramrod 99Failed To Return GERMAN A/C, BE-NE-LX ?. / JG1, Crash area near Nieuwendijk, Zuid Holland KilledBergen Solheim




Helge Sognnæs, lieutenant, Bergen. By Sigurd Sognnæs and Anna Marie Jæger b. Terkelsen. Middle school, vocational school. Participated in the battles at Voss 1940, and went to England on 6 June this year. Trained as a pilot in Little Norway, and was a fighter pilot from the summer of 1941. Fell during an air battle over the Netherlands on 22 June 1943. Sognnæs took part in the fighting at Voss in 1940 during the German invasion of Norway, and went to England on June 6 of the same year to enlist in the Norwegian military command there. He was sent to Little Norway in Canada where he received pilot training in the first fighter cohort at the flight school. After a stay at a British training squadron, he joined 331 Sqd with military roll number N106, and eventually became a lieutenant.

22 June 1943 would be Helge’s last flight. This day a massive Allied air attack was conducted against targets in Germany, Belgium and The Netherlands. Simultaneously two diversionary attacks were directed against Antwerp and Rotterdam. 42 bombers attacked the Belgian port, while a small group of 12 B-25 bombers attacked targets in the port of Rotterdam. The aim of the supporting attacks was to spread the German fighters to a maximum. More than twenty allied fighter squadrons were in the air to protect the bombers this day. Early in the morning, nine aircraft from 331 Squadron transferred from North Weald to Martlesham east of Ipswich to be ready to meet the bombers in the air over The Channel. Under the leadership of major Rolf Arne Berg they took off again at 7:42. The mission was to protect the bombers attacking the port of Rotterdam. Helge Sognnaes flew in a section headed by Sven Heglund. Heglund would end the war as the squadron’s top ace with 16 downed aircraft. In the German fighter base Woensdrecht in the Netherlands the alarm goes off when the Allied attack on Rotterdam is detected on the radar. Twenty-two FW-190 fighters take off and head in the direction the port. One of the pilots is Oberveldwebel Reinhard Flecks. The Norwegian fighters reject several attacks on the bomber formation, and the attack on Rotterdam was completed as planned. However, on the return flight they meet the German aircraft from Woensdrecht again. The encounter evolves into a real dogfight. Sven Heglund can see the Spitfire with Helge Sognnaes in the cockpit beneath him. He has a FW-190 on his tail. Before Heglund can warn his classmate from pilot school, the aircraft is hit by shells from the German plane. The FW-190 is piloted by Feldwebel Reinhard Flecks of 6./JG 1, flying an Fw 190A from Woensdrecht airfield. Flecks has inflicted a direct hit that blows off the whole tail of the Norwegian Spitfire. The plane hits the ground and aircraft components are spread over a large area.

After the crash, Helge Sognnaes was buried at the Crooswijk cemetery in Rotterdam. In 1946 he was cremated in Rotterdam at the request of his family, after which his ashes were sent to his family in Bergen Norway.


Norwegian 331 Squadron pilots in November 1942. On top: Johannes Greiner, Martin Gran. Second row, l-r: Helge Sognnæs (died 1943), Leif Lundsten (d. 1944), Stein Sem (d. 1942), Knut Bache (d. 1944), Anton C. Hagerup (d. 1943), Rolf Arne Berg (d. 1945), the Squadron's Intelligence Officer Philip Yatman, Rolf Engelsen and Svein Heglund. Bottom: Reidar Haave Olsen (d. 1944), Kristian Nyerrød, Fredrik Fearnley (d. 1944) with Varg, Kaj Birksted from Denmark and Tarald Weisteen.

7 SemStein Kapt.1919-10-07 EidsvollNorwayPilotSt. Olav Medal with Palme

Haakon Vll 70th Commemorative Medal

RNoAFFighter Command331 Sqd Norwegian

1942-12-12SPITFIRELF.IXBS469FN-V2North WealdPMCircusFailed To Return GERMAN A/C, BRITAIN Fw190, Crashed into North sea off NorfolkKilled
See BL833

SEM, STEIN, captain of the Air Force, Eidsvoll. Born October 7, 1919 in Gjerpen, p. Lars Sem & Regine b. Sørensen. Artium, flight school at Kjeller. Served in the Air Force when the war broke out, and took part in the fighting. Went to England in May 1940 and from there in August to Canada, where he became an instructor at the flight school in Little Norway. Underwent combat flight school in England in 1941 and in August joined 331 Sqd as a fighter pilot. Participated in several operations and in May 1942 became a lieutenant, and on 1 September s. Å. Captain in the Air Force. Fell December 13, 1942 in air battle over France. The St. Olavs medal with oak branch post mortem, Haakon VII's 70th medal.

331Sq 'FN-V' 1-10-42 Shot down by Fw190 off Cromer 12-12-42 Capt S Sem+

Norwegian 331 Squadron pilots in November 1942. On top: Johannes Greiner, Martin Gran. Second row, l-r: Helge Sognnæs (died 1943), Leif Lundsten (d. 1944), Stein Sem (d. 1942), Knut Bache (d. 1944), Anton C. Hagerup (d. 1943), Rolf Arne Berg (d. 1945), the Squadron's Intelligence Officer Philip Yatman, Rolf Engelsen and Svein Heglund. Bottom: Reidar Haave Olsen (d. 1944), Kristian Nyerrød, Fredrik Fearnley (d. 1944) with Varg, Kaj Birksted from Denmark and Tarald Weisteen.


FF 26-9-42 331S 'FN-V' 1-10-42 Shot down by Fw190 off Cromer 12-12-42 Capt S Sem killed
8 RygJon Ltn13 March 1914 in GloppenNorwayPilotDFC

Krigskorset
RNoAFFighter Command332 Sqd Norwegian

1942-08-27SPITFIREV2 + 1 probableNorth WealdCat B? BRITISH Ground fire , BRITAIN unk, Landed in sea damaged airfield North WealdSafe. Died 11 February 2005 Age 90



Ryg demonstrating dingy technique
See BS507

After the Norwegian forces in southern Norway had to give up the fight against the German invasion forces, Ryg went to northern Norway, which was still controlled by the Norwegian authorities. When King Haakon 7 and the Nygaardsvold government evacuated to Britain, Ryg accompanied them on board the same British ship, HMS Devonshire.

Pilot training in Canada. CO of 332 Sqd in June 1944. He succeeded Rolf Arne Berg as operations group commander (Wing Commander Flying) for 132 Wing, which included the Norwegian 331 Sqd and 332 Sqd, when Berg died in February 1945. After the war, Ryg was chief of the Air War School from 1953 to 1954, chief of the UN Air Force in Congo from 1962, and chief of the operations staff of the Armed Forces High Command from 1970 to 1975. His last position in the Air Force was as deputy commander of the Northern Command at Kolsås. for the air forces of the command. He was then a lieutenant general.


332 Sqd veterans Jon Ryg and Eric Westly, here at North Weald with fresh DFC medals on their chests. Westly was born in Manila, Philipines and joined the Norwegian effort at Little Norway in Canada late in 1940. He often wore a wig as he had contracted a disease as a child which left him bald. He survived the war.


Ryg as Wng Cdr in personalized Spitfire 1945


Norwegians returning to North Weald 27 Aug 1942
9 OlsenReidar Haave Fnr.1923-11-07 HommedalNorwayPilotSt. Olav Medal with Oak
RNoAFFighter Command331 Sqd Norwegian

1943-07-29Spitfire4Escort
SEE MJ724

OLSEN, REIDAR HAAVE, lieutenant in the air force, Eide in Aust-Agder. By Tønnes Olsen and Klara Johansen. Middle School, Brooklyn College. Became a pilot in Canada, later in the Norwegian Air Force in England. Flew 101 times over enemy territory, participated in convoy patrols 30 times and shot down 4 German planes. Died in a plane crash on 19 February 1944 in Epping, England. The St. Olavs medal with oak branch. Mentioned in Nordisk Tidende 11 November 1943.

After escorting American bomber planes to areas Merville and Poix, 331 SQN took a turn northwards in 27.000ft and discovered below 12-15 Bf 109 between Merville and Ypres. This was Jagdstaffel 11./JG 26, attached to III./JG as an "Endausbildungsstaffel" for JG 26 under Hptm. Steindl. They was scrambled alone from airfield Vendeville and Uffz. Müller was shortly after start brought down most probably by Kapt. Heglund who claimed a "flamer". Fnr. Haave Olsen then shot pieces of another who spun down. 331 Sqd had no loss. All 3 pilots were very gifted and Kapt. Svein Heglund (correct name) later to became the top scoring Norwegian Spitfire pilot and also top scoring Mosquito nightfighter pilot, But still he was a very modest claimer compared to other aces from foreign Allied countries in RAF.

331 Sqd claimed 2-0-1 Bf109s. Kapt. Sven Heglund 1-0-0 near Ypres, Sjt. Reidar Haave Olsen 1-0-0 in Lille area and Kapt. Martin Gran 0-0-1 also in Lille area. All claimed the victories at 19.00. As you know Merville is W of Lille. Ypres NNW of Lille. I think Olsen might have been the successful fighter more than Gran or Heglund. Distance from Merville to Ypres is roughly equivalent to the distance between Merville and Lille, and Uffz Walter Müller actually crashed in Calonne sur la Lys, the village next to Merville airfield, but on the other side.

Norwegian 331 Squadron pilots in November 1942. On top: Johannes Greiner, Martin Gran. Second row, l-r: Helge Sognnæs (died 1943), Leif Lundsten (d. 1944), Stein Sem (d. 1942), Knut Bache (d. 1944), Anton C. Hagerup (d. 1943), Rolf Arne Berg (d. 1945), the Squadron's Intelligence Officer Philip Yatman, Rolf Engelsen and Svein Heglund. Bottom: Reidar Haave Olsen (d. 1944), Kristian Nyerrød, Fredrik Fearnley (d. 1944) with Varg, Kaj Birksted from Denmark and Tarald Weisteen.

10 NyerrødKristianNorwayPilotRNoAFFighter Command122 Sqd Norwegian

1944 -05-06MustangFX954Coltishall16:45Day RangerSafe




6 May 1944 (19.20 hrs). Lundby Coppice, 8 km South East of Aalborg. Mustang Mk III, FX955 (QV- ). On the first Mustang Day Ranger to Denmark 2 Mustangs of 19 Sqd and 2 Mustangs from 122 Sqd from RAF Coltishall targeted the airfields near Grove and Aalborg. W/O M.H. Bell from 19 Sqd had engine trouble and failed to take off. The other 3 took off at 16.45 hrs lead by the Norwegian airman Lt Nyerrød in Mustang FX954. The formation made landfall at Thorsminde and went on over Aggersund to Rødslet. F/Lt. L. Burra-Robinson in FZ168 took charge when Lt Nyerrød got oil on his windscreen. At Rødslet F/0 Eric Lionel Germain in Mustang FX955 and Lt Nyerrød attacked 2 parked JU88s. They managed to damage the 2 German planes in spite of heavy fire from light flak. The formation went on towards Rørdal east of Aalborg, where Burra-Robinson shot a parked Henschel 129 ablaze. When the formation was assembled after the attack, Burra-Robinson and Nyerrød spotted 4 Fw190s which attacked from the south. The 3 Mustangs broke away, but Germain at the rear reacted a bit slowly and was hit. The 2 other airmen saw flames from Germain's plane, and that it went down towards the ground in a vertical spin. Nyerrød and Burra-Robinson found protection in clouds nearby, and later, when they got out, the Germans had disappeared, but they clearly saw Germain's burning plane in a small wood. At 21.30 hrs 2 Mustangs landed at RAF Coltishall. F/O Germain perished. He was buried at Frederikshavn Cemetery on 17 May 1944.

'During one of many conversations with Kristian Nyerrød he told me that through all of the years from 1944 to the present day he had had a sad feeling that he was responsible for Germain's death on 6 May 1944. Kristian was in charge of the Day Ranger Mission to Aalborg on the day when Germain was shot down by German fighters in Lundby Coppice south of Aalborg. While we were talking about it, he took out his wallet and picked out a worn stamp-size photo of Germain. Since the war he had kept it in his wallet as a precious memory of Germain. It was a photo he had cut out of a large group photo of personnel of Germain's unit, 19 Sqd.'

Norwegian 331 Squadron pilots in November 1942. On top: Johannes Greiner, Martin Gran. Second row, l-r: Helge Sognnæs (died 1943), Leif Lundsten (d. 1944), Stein Sem (d. 1942), Knut Bache (d. 1944), Anton C. Hagerup (d. 1943), Rolf Arne Berg (d. 1945), the Squadron's Intelligence Officer Philip Yatman, Rolf Engelsen and Svein Heglund. Bottom: Reidar Haave Olsen (d. 1944), Kristian Nyerrød, Fredrik Fearnley (d. 1944) with Varg, Kaj Birksted from Denmark and Tarald Weisteen.

11 NyerrødKristianNorwayPilotRNoAFFighter Command331 Sqd Norwegian

Spitfire




Norwegian 331 Squadron pilots in November 1942. On top: Johannes Greiner, Martin Gran. Second row, l-r: Helge Sognnæs (died 1943), Leif Lundsten (d. 1944), Stein Sem (d. 1942), Knut Bache (d. 1944), Anton C. Hagerup (d. 1943), Rolf Arne Berg (d. 1945), the Squadron's Intelligence Officer Philip Yatman, Rolf Engelsen and Svein Heglund. Bottom: Reidar Haave Olsen (d. 1944), Kristian Nyerrød, Fredrik Fearnley (d. 1944) with Varg, Kaj Birksted from Denmark and Tarald Weisteen.

12 MehreHelge Olrik Major1 February 1911 in NarvikNorwayPilotWar Cross + Sword

Haakon Vll Commemorative

DSO

DFC


DFC USA

Commander Order Orange Nassau

OBE

Krigsmedaljen

Commander Swedish Sword Order

RNoAFFighter Command331 Sqd Norwegian

1943-04-13SPITFIRELF.IXEN126FN-H6North WealdCircus 282Cat B GERMAN A/C, BRITAIN ?. / JG2, Landing damage airfield FordSafe. Died 17 September 1997 in Oslo



Mehre's analysis of 132 Wing
When World War II broke out, Helge Mehre was a pilot and policeman. After participating in the early acts of war in Norway, he came to Canada. After a period at Little Norway, it was back to England. Here Mehre became CO 331 Sqd, and later commander of the Norwegian 132 wing. Took part in the Allied advance through France, Belgium and the Netherlands. After the war, Mehre continued in the Air Force. Among other things, he was director of the Norwegian Defense College, before ending his military career as a commander at Akershus Fortress. He was then Major General.

Helge Mehre Squadron Commander 331. 5.1-1942 to 5.9-1942. and 1.3-1943 to 14.5-1943.


CO 132 (N) Wing, Lt-Colonel Helge Mehre (left) and Lt-Colonel Rolf Arne Berg in front of Berg's plane. Berg was shot down in this plane.

Supermarine Spitfire EN126 Mk IX Const #3589, Built at Chattis Hill.
FF 6-11-42, assigned to 336th FS USAAF 8-11-42, transferred to 331S 'FN-H' 23-11-42, to AST 7-3-43 mods, assigned to 165S 23-2-44, transferred to 131S 19-3-44, Fighter Leaders School 29-8-44, FA Cat AC 15-11-44, ROS, to Central Fighter Est, FA Cat AC 3-12-45, ROS, SOC, Sold scrap H Bath 27-10-49.
13 LundstenLeif 'Ludeu'Major1918-05-24NorwayPilotDFC

St. Olav Medal with Oak

Kriegsmedaljen

King Haakon Vll's 70th Medal
RNoAFFighter Command331 Sqd Norwegian (CO)

1944-06-09SPITFIRELF.IXMK966FN-NBognor RegisContact PatrFailed To Return AMERICAN Ship fire, FRANCE unk, Crash near IsignyKilled


LUNDSTEN, LEIF, major, Ø. Toten. By Otto Lundsten And Laura b. Heggernes. Artium, flight school, technical school in Gothenburg. Came to England in May 1940, and to Toronto the same year for a shorter training course. Underwent combat flight school in England in 1941 and entered 331 Sqd. Became CO in March 1944. His plane was hit on June 9, 1944 during the invasion of France and disappeared without a trace. He was accidentally shot down by Allied ships after a patrol when the squadron was on its way home. Despite being hit, he headed the rest of the squadron home over the radio.

St. Olav's medal with oak branch, War Medal, Haakon Vll's 70th medal, DFC. Mentioned in Aftenposten 1946, and Opland 13 June 1946

On 31 March 1944 the Norwegians moved to Bognor Regis in West Sussex in order to be closer to the continent. It was from Bognor Regis the Norwegians did their work on during D-Day. 331 Squadron was led by Captain Leif Lundsten from Østre Toten, Norway. Lundsten had been with 331 Squadron since the early days at Skeabrea in the Orkney Islands, and was one of Norway’s most experienced fighter pilots. Before leaving for a well deserved rest in 1943, he had notched up over 100 offensive sorties, and had several confirmed kills to his name. During his rest period he had flown over 300 Spitfires (Mk.VIII, XI, XIV and XII) as a test pilot at RAF Worthy Down, including the famous Spitfire Mk.XII MB882.

Leif Lundsten was killed by friendly fire over Isigny just three days after D-Day. He was 26 years old when he perished. His final act as a Squadron Leader before disappearing was to give his squadron the correct course back to base. This act was vividly remembered by his pilots in the coming decades after WWII.



Norwegian 331 Squadron pilots in November 1942. On top: Johannes Greiner, Martin Gran. Second row, l-r: Helge Sognnæs (died 1943), Leif Lundsten (d. 1944), Stein Sem (d. 1942), Knut Bache (d. 1944), Anton C. Hagerup (d. 1943), Rolf Arne Berg (d. 1945), the Squadron's Intelligence Officer Philip Yatman, Rolf Engelsen and Svein Heglund. Bottom: Reidar Haave Olsen (d. 1944), Kristian Nyerrød, Fredrik Fearnley (d. 1944) with Varg, Kaj Birksted from Denmark and Tarald Weisteen.



L-R: Leif Lundsten - Arnt Hvinden - Morten Ree 1938
14 JohansenAlf Johan Kvm.7 February 1913 in BrunlanesNorwayA/G Front FMA/A/GHaakon Vll Commemorative Medal

Krigsmedaljen

RNoAFCoastal Command330 Sqd Norwegian

1944-05-16SUNDERLANDIIIJM6772-VSullom VoeAnti Submarine SweepCat B GERMAN Ship fire, BRITAIN U-boat U-240, Landing damage harbour Sullom VoeKilledBerg Cemetery


SEE entry for 1944-05-16 Carl Thorleif Johnsen JM677

JOHANSEN, ALF JOHAN, quartermaster, Brunlanes. By Ingvald Johansen and Anna b. Olsen. Was a fisherman until 1937, then sailed as a sailor on long voyages between China and America until the war broke out. Was enlisted in the Air Force's forces in Little Norway in June 1941. Underwent recruiting school in Toronto, later trained as an aerial gunner and mechanic. In August 1941, he was ordered to 330 Squadron in Iceland and in 1943 became quartermaster in the navy's air force. Died on May 17, 1944 during a mission in the Atlantic in a fight with a German submarine. He was hit by projectiles and died immediately. Buried in Berg cemetery. Haakon Vll's 70th Medal and the War Medal post mortem.
15 BacheKnut Ltn.4341918-06-20 Buenos AiresNorwayPilotDFC

St. Olav Medal with Oak

Kriegsmedaljen

King Haakon Vll's 70th

RNoAFFighter Command331 Sqd Norwegian

1944-05-07SPITFIRELF.IXMK182FN-FBognor RegisEveningRamrod 843Failed To Return GERMAN Ground fire , FRANCE unk, Crash near airfield MoorseeleKilledUllern Churchyard





Ullern Churchyard, Oslo
BACHE, KNUT, air lieutenant, Ullern. By Eilif Bache and Ragnhild b. Engebretsen. Artium, business high school, Berlin Business School. Came to Toronto on April 28, 1941 and attended recruiting school and flight school. Came to England in March 1942 and went to combat school for fighter pilots. In June Ordered to 331 Sqd, and big air battles over France and Belgium. Served from September 1943 to March 1944 as an instructor, then returned to 331 Sqd. Killed during a low level sweep over Reims/Pontoise area, an attack on a French airport on May 7, 1944 when the plane was hit by flak, hit the ground and exploded. He was shot down by flak in Spit Mk.IX MK182 FN-F near Moiselle airfield in France. Initially interred in France but post-war his remains were brought to Norway. He now rests in Ullern Churchyard. The St. Olavs Medal with Oak, the War Medal, Haakon Vll's 70th Medal and DFC.


Reidar Haave Olsen, Knut Bache, Kristian Nyerrød, Leif Lundsten, Kaj Birksted, Guy Peter Lockwood Owren, and Stein Sem

Norwegian 331 Squadron pilots in November 1942. On top: Johannes Greiner, Martin Gran. Second row, l-r: Helge Sognnæs (died 1943), Leif Lundsten (d. 1944), Stein Sem (d. 1942), Knut Bache (d. 1944), Anton C. Hagerup (d. 1943), Rolf Arne Berg (d. 1945), the Squadron's Intelligence Officer Philip Yatman, Rolf Engelsen and Svein Heglund. Bottom: Reidar Haave Olsen (d. 1944), Kristian Nyerrød, Fredrik Fearnley (d. 1944) with Varg, Kaj Birksted from Denmark and Tarald Weisteen.



ORB 1944-05-07
16 HeglundSvein Ltn.1918-12-10 KristianiaNorwayPilotDSO


DFC & Bar

War Cross with 2 Swords


Legion of Merit
RNoAFFighter Command331 Sqd Norwegian

1943-01-22SPITFIRELF.IXBS144FN-C16North WealdCircus 253Cat C / Cat B GERMAN A/C, BRITAIN Fw 190, Landing damage airfield MastonSafe
Leading Norwegian Ace.

Heglund had tried to enlist with the Norwegian army flight school in the autumn of 1939 but the admission deadline had already expired. Travelled to Zurich to study engineering. He was in Switzerland when Norway was invaded by Germany in April 1940. Heglund managed to reach the United States via Bordeaux and Portsmouth. In New York he joined fellow Norwegians (Bernt Balchen, Hjalmar Riiser-Larsen and some other Norwegian officers) in the Army Air Force. In July 1940 he went to Little Norway near Toronto, Canada. Heglund travelled from Canada to Britain and joined 59 OTU where he trained on Miles Master and then the Hawker Hurricane fighter. Joined newly formed 331 Sqd (Norwegian) on Orkney. Based at RAF Skeabrae flying Hurricane Mk.IIBs. The squadron's duties were to fly cover over the Royal Navy base at Scapa Flow and escort convoys. In November 1941 the squadron received Spitfire Mk. IIAs, which in March 1942 was replaced with Spitfire Mk. Vb. A few weeks later the squadron moved south to an RAF North Weald in Essex. The squadron was now involved in escorting bombers to targets on the continent and defending London from air attack. After completing over 200 hours of operational flying Heglund was sent to a Spitfire OTU in February 1943. After three months, he returned to 331 Sqd as a newly appointed captain and commander of the squadron's A-flight. Whilst with 331 Sqd Heglund shot down 12 fighters confirmed with 5 probables. In November 1943 Heglund transferred to RAF Ferry Command, transporting aircraft from manufacturer to airfields. In 1944 contacted John Cunningham, former commander of 85 Squadron RAF. With this squadron he trained on the Mosquito and became a night fighter. During the war he shot down 16 German planes; 7 Focke-Wulf Fw 190, 6 Messerschmitt Bf 109 and as a night fighter he shot down 3 Messerschmitt Bf 110. On 20 July 1945 Heglund was awarded the War Cross for the second time. He was awarded the DFC twice and DSO.

Norwegian 331 Squadron pilots in November 1942. On top: Johannes Greiner, Martin Gran. Second row, l-r: Helge Sognnæs (died 1943), Leif Lundsten (d. 1944), Stein Sem (d. 1942), Knut Bache (d. 1944), Anton C. Hagerup (d. 1943), Rolf Arne Berg (d. 1945), the Squadron's Intelligence Officer Philip Yatman, Rolf Engelsen and Svein Heglund. Bottom: Reidar Haave Olsen (d. 1944), Kristian Nyerrød, Fredrik Fearnley (d. 1944) with Varg, Kaj Birksted from Denmark and Tarald Weisteen.



L-R: Heglund with Ottar Malm North Weald
17 Hansen Frits Henry BergSgtR.11645731 May 1922DenmarkW/Op Air GunnerRCAFSafeEnlists 17 July 1941 in Winnipeg, MB. Trained as Wireless Operator/Air Gunner. Discharged on 29 September 1945.
18 HagerupAnthon Christopher Ltn.1919-11-25 TønsbergNorwayPilotRNoAFCoastal Command333 Sqd Norwegian

1943-06-23MOSQUITOIIDZ754FLeuchars10:10 - unkShipping Str.Failed To Return GERMAN Ship fire, NORWAY unk, Crash probably on a small island , near lighthouse Yttyane 20km W of FlorKilledAskvoll
HAGERUP, ANTON CHRISTOPHER, lieutenant in the Air Force. Born 25 November 1919 in Tønsberg, son of captain Leif S. T. Hagerup, and Doris Sofie Henriette née Christophersen. Secondary school diploma. Army air academy and military academy. Was a cadet in second year of military academy until 9 April 1940. Served as airman in the north of Norway during the combats in 1940. Travelled around the world and came to Canada in 1941. Served as fighter pilot in England from June 1941 until September 1942. Was later pilot of Mosquito and took part in many operations off the Norwegian coast. Was shot down on 23 June 1943 by the air defence during an attack on a German convoy off Stavenes in Sogn. Buried at Askvoll.

Aircraft started, together with another Mosquito plane on a recce of the Norwegian coast from lighthouse Holmengr near Bergen and northwards. 3 ships were after a while sighted. Both planes attacked the leading ship but encountered accurate 20mm flak defence. Aircraft then hit passing over and rolled over three times before crashing on land and bursting into flames

Norwegian 331 Squadron pilots in November 1942. On top: Johannes Greiner, Martin Gran. Second row, l-r: Helge Sognnæs (died 1943), Leif Lundsten (d. 1944), Stein Sem (d. 1942), Knut Bache (d. 1944), Anton C. Hagerup (d. 1943), Rolf Arne Berg (d. 1945), the Squadron's Intelligence Officer Philip Yatman, Rolf Engelsen and Svein Heglund. Bottom: Reidar Haave Olsen (d. 1944), Kristian Nyerrød, Fredrik Fearnley (d. 1944) with Varg, Kaj Birksted from Denmark and Tarald Weisteen.



Memorial, Askvoll
19 GranMartin Yngvar1151917-08-13 EnnebakNorwayPilotDFC & 2 Bars

War Cross with swords

Croix de Guerre with Palme

St. Olav's Medal with Oak Branch

Haakon Vll's 70th Anniversary Medal

RNoAFFighter Command332 Sqd Norwegian

Spitfire9 + 2 probableDied 2004-05-16 Age 86


Participated in the fight against the occupying forces. On June 7, 1940, he left Tromsø aboard HMS Devonshire, the British cruiser that evacuated King Haakon and the Norwegian government to Britain. Sent to Canada where from 1940 to 1941 he attended flight school at Little Norway outside Toronto. He was trained as a fighter pilot and flew 345 operational cruises with Spitfires during the war years. During the Allied invasion of France, Gran became CO 331 Sqd. After World War II, completed RAF Staff College from 1945 to 1946. From 1947 to 1949 he was a pilot in Braathens before returning to the Armed Forces. In the Air Force, Gran became CO 332 Sqd and 337 Sqd. He became a lieutenant colonel in 1953 and a colonel in 1963. In 1963 he was at the Norwegian Defense College and the same year he became chief of the Air Force Operations Staff. In the last years of his career in the Armed Forces, from 1968 to 1977, he was station chief at the Air Force's station Mågerø.



Died 2004

Norwegian 331 Squadron pilots in November 1942. On top: Johannes Greiner, Martin Gran. Second row, l-r: Helge Sognnæs (died 1943), Leif Lundsten (d. 1944), Stein Sem (d. 1942), Knut Bache (d. 1944), Anton C. Hagerup (d. 1943), Rolf Arne Berg (d. 1945), the Squadron's Intelligence Officer Philip Yatman, Rolf Engelsen and Svein Heglund. Bottom: Reidar Haave Olsen (d. 1944), Kristian Nyerrød, Fredrik Fearnley (d. 1944) with Varg, Kaj Birksted from Denmark and Tarald Weisteen.

20 GarbenJohan Wilhelm Ltn.166918 May 1921 in Pierrefitte-Nestalas, FranceNorwayPilotHaakon Vll Commemorative Medal

Krigsmedaljen

RNoAFFighter Command331 Sqd Norwegian

1945-03-13SPITFIRELF.IXPL162FN-SB85 Schijndel15:00Scramble, enemy over NijmegenFailed To Return GERMAN Ground fire , GERMANY unk, Crash N of RodenkirchenKilled


GARBEN, JOHAN WILHELM, Air Lieutenant, Oslo. By Christian Wilhelm Garben and Ida f. Berg, b. 1898 in Texas. Went to 3rd high school when he moved to Canada in 1940 after participating in the fighting in Norway. Trained as a fighter pilot, advanced from sergeant to ensign and became a lieutenant in July 1944. Served in 331 Squadron and was involved in a number of air strikes on German positions in Belgium and France. Died during operations over Nijmegen on March 13, 1945. The War Medal and Haakon Vll's 70th Medal.

45MU 17-7-44 317S 22-2-45 331S 'FN-S' 13-3-45 Sweep to Wesel pm Shot down while attacking ground targets nr Rodenkirchen aircraft disintegrated 13-3-45 Lt J W Garben killed


ORB Report


ORB Report



Garben with then-Prince Harald at Little Norway in Canada
21 Berg-OlsenEyolf Johannes Sjt.24 December 1920 in BergenNorwayPilotRNoAFFighter Command331 Sqd Norwegian

1943-04-13SPITFIRELF.IXBS299FN-LNorth WealdCircus 282Failed To Return GERMAN A/C, FRANCE ?. / JG2, Crashed into sea English ChannelKilledMøllendal Kapell, Bergen, Hordaland, Norway

BERG-OLSEN, EYOLF JOHANNES, Sergeant, Bergen. By ship broker Eyolf Berg-Olsen and Betty b. Hagland. Artium on the English line 1939, went to high school to take realartium with a view to getting into N. T. H. when the war broke out. Together with his older brother and a couple of others, he came over to England. Trained as a pilot in Toronto, returned to England and finished training there. Fell in an air battle over Normandy 13 April 1943 Caen, Calvados, Lower Normandy, France. Mentioned in Morgenavisen, Bergen, September 1946.



Obituary Bergens Tidende 8. Mai 1945.

Supermarine Spitfire BS299 Mk IX, Const #3266, Built at Chattis Hill. FF 17-8-42, assigned to 133S 18-8-42, transferred to 331S 'FN-L' 29-9-42, according to VAWD records this aircraft was Cv VII standards and tested for det of static longitudinal stab 4-2-43, escort Venturas to Caen shot down by Fw190s 13-4-43 Sgt E J Berg-Olsen killed in action.
22 EngelsenRolf 2nd LtN822NorwayPilotRNoAFFighter Command331 Sqd Norwegian

1943-05-02SPITFIRELF.IXBR594FN-RNorth Weald18:30RamrodFailed To Return GERMAN A/C, BE-NE-LX ?. / JG 1, Crash area Schelde area 6 km N of Domburg PoW

Shot down by Unteroffizier Hans Meissner of the 6./JG 1, flying an Fw 190A from Woensdrecht airfield. Operation: Ramrod – short range bomber attacks to destroy ground targets, similar to Circus attacks Target: Vlissingen

Survived POW; saved from his dinghy by personnel of MAA/202

Norwegian 331 Squadron pilots in November 1942. On top: Johannes Greiner, Martin Gran. Second row, l-r: Helge Sognnæs (died 1943), Leif Lundsten (d. 1944), Stein Sem (d. 1942), Knut Bache (d. 1944), Anton C. Hagerup (d. 1943), Rolf Arne Berg (d. 1945), the Squadron's Intelligence Officer Philip Yatman, Rolf Engelsen and Svein Heglund. Bottom: Reidar Haave Olsen (d. 1944), Kristian Nyerrød, Fredrik Fearnley (d. 1944) with Varg, Kaj Birksted from Denmark and Tarald Weisteen.

23 DanielsenKyrre Berg Kvm. 6 January 1913 in LavangenNorwayFMA/A/GRNoAFCoastal Command333 Sqd Norwegian

1944-05-17CATALINAIFP1213-CWoodhaven00:06Cat E? GERMAN Ship fire, BRITAIN Uboot U-668, Landing damage seaplane harbour WoodhavenKilledLavangen

SEE: entry for Harald Hartmann FP121 1944-05-17

Catalina attacked German U-boat U-668 SW of lesund, off Norway and was then hit hard by return fire. Crew able to escape back to Britain and after landing the flying-boat was put on land.

DANIELSEN, KYRRE BERG, quartermaster in the Air Force, Ålesund. By Ludvik Danielsen and Lydia b. Karlsen. Married 1935 in Ålesund. 2 children. Was a fisherman and worker before the war. Went to England during the war. Served in the Air Force, first in Canada from 1941 and later at 330 Squadron in Iceland as a boatman. Transferred to 333 Squadron at Dundee in March 1943. He was trained as an aerial gunner and appointed quartermaster on 15 January 1944. Died on 17 May 1944 as a gunner on a Catalina aircraft carrier while fighting a German submarine, which was sunk by the aircraft. Hit by shrapnel when over U-boat. Buried in Lavangen cemetery.
24 ChristieWerner Hosewinckel*Obsltn.N10711917-12-13 VangNorwayPilotDSO

DFC

St. Olav Medal with Oak

War Cross With Sword

RNoAFFighter Command332 Sqd Norwegian (CO)

234 Sqd (CO)

Hunsdon WING
1945-04-18MUSTANGIVaKH790WHC11Bentwatersunk - 13:45RamrodFailed To Return GERMAN Ground fire , GERMANY unk, Crash near Handorf.PoW



Born in Vang, Hedmark, son of Professor Werner Hosewinckel Christie and Karen Amalie Wedel-Jarlsberg. In 1945 he married Elisabeth Marie Cathrine Hille. Took his examen artium in 1935, and attended the Technische College of Berlin from 1935 to 1937 and Hærens Flyveskole from 1937 to 1939. As World War II broke out, Christie, with the rank of sergeant, was called to Sola Airport as a member of Norway's neutrality guard. However the airport was attacked by Germany on 9 April 1940 and fighting ensued. The Norwegians lost the battle, but Christie managed to retreat to the inner country. His group was involved in fighting until 23 April, whereafter it retreated further east. Norway eventually fell to German rule, and in the autumn of 1940 Christie fled to Canada via Sweden, the Soviet Union and the United States. He joined the air force-in-exile at Little Norway, and spent the rest of the war as a fighter pilot. He commanded Norwegian 332 Sqd, then the RAF's 234 Sqd, and as Wing Leader of 150 Wing and the Hunsdon Wing flying the P-51 Mustang, reaching the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. After 244 operational missions he was shot down over Germany on 18 April 1945 and held as PoW until the war's end. Not many from his Hærens Flyveskole class survived the war.

D-Day 1944: 332 Squadron wrote a bit more about the day in their Operations Book: ‘On this first invasion day of Europe, 332 Squadron made 4 patrol flights over the channel and the battle fields of Northern France. At 0715 hours, the squadron took off on the first patrol led by Major Christie. They returned safely at 0920 hours. 2nd flight was led by Major Christie too. ‘They took off at 1215 hours and returned 1420 hours. On the third flight, Major Christie led, but due to trouble with the drop tank he had to return after 15 min, and Capt. Ryg took over. They had taken off at 1630 hours and landed at 1810 hours. The fourth flight was led by W/C Berg. They took off at 2040 hours and returned at 2245. During these four patrols, they met no enemy fighter opposition and almost no flak was experienced. Weather was 5-8/10th cloud and visibility good. 331 and 332 Squadron landed back at Bognor Regis without a single loss during that special day. That was perhaps the biggest surprise of all to the Norwegians. After they had been debriefed by a newly arrived Norwegian officer, they all got a cup of hot chocolate. Rønhof wrote: 'We were terribly tired when we finally got to bed. It had been a great and historic day which without doubt would be spoken of by generations and generations coming after us. The world would hopefully never experience such a battle of this size ever again.'

The final victory for a WWII RAF Mustang belonged to Norwegian ace Werner Christie, who was flying his personal machine KH790. On 16 April, Christie, flying KH790, led the escort for a Lancaster raid on Swinmünde. When the bombers were safely on their way home he took 611 Sqd down on a strafing sweep, initially flying to the east of Berlin. At 1750 hrs near Finow airfield, northeast of the enemy capital, some 20+ short-nosed Fw 190 were spotted above the Mustangs IVs at 10,000 ft. Christie closed on one of the Fws: 'I opened up, firing a five-second burst at the leading aircraft in a formation of three, range 150 yards, and observed strikes on the port side of the engine and cockpit, and also that his starboard wingtip was damaged. The aircraft then began to smoke badly and glide straight ahead. I pulled out to the port side and made a second attack, opening up at 200 yards and again closing in to about 50 yards, ending up dead astern. I fired several short bursts lasting ten seconds, and during the attack I observed strikes on the cockpit, engine and both wings. The fighter´s port wing fell off and the port undercarriage leg fell down, after which it did five or six quick rolls horizontally and crashed in flames in a wood'. This would be Christie's eleventh and final victory of the war.


Christie's Mustang KH790


Leading the Hunsdon Wing over Berlin during its successful foray on 16 April 1945, was a Norwegian, Lieutenant Colonel Werner Christie. This painting by Mark Postlethwaite GAvA shows Christie, at the controls of his personally-marked Mustang, KH790 WHC, shooting down one of the Focke-Wulf Fw 190s that the RAF long-range fighters encountered that day. This was the last occasion in the Second World War when an Ace flying an RAF Mustang was credited with an aerial victory. Note the red spinner on Christie’s aircraft. This feature, he noted, made his 'aeroplane a little easier to spot and formate upon after a dogfight or ground attack'.

Kai Birksted-Arne Austeen-Werner Christie-Nils Jørsted: DFC Ceremony March 1944
25 BergslandPer *Sjt.Bærum 1918-01-17NorwayPilotMC
RNoAFFighter Command332 Sqd Norwegian

1942-08-19SPITFIREVAB269AH-DNorth Weald06.20 - unkDieppe RaidFailed To Return GERMAN A/C, FRANCE Fw190, Crash near DieppePoW. Died 1992-06-09


Pilot bailed out. Pilot later successfully escaped, 'The Great Escape' 25-03-1944.

Per Bergsland served as an instructor at flight school in Canada before he transferred to the RAF Ferry Command, where he was assigned to fly with a combat unit. As a member of 332 Sqd stationed at North Weald airfield, Bergsland's Spitfire Mk.Vb AB269 was shot down by a German Focke-Wulf Fw 190 during the Dieppe Raid on 19 August 1942. After arriving at the POW camp, he gave his name as 'Peter Rockland' (Per = Petrus, meaning rock in Greek, and Berg meaning mountain or rock in Norwegian), in order to protect his family in Norway from German persecution. In what later became known as The Great Escape, he was escapee #43 among the 76 prisoners of war who managed to escape from the camp via tunnel with another Norwegian pilot, escapee #44 Jens Müller. 'Bergsland was wearing a civilian suit he had made for himself from a Royal Marine uniform, with an RAF overcoat slightly altered with brown leather sewn over the buttons. A black RAF tie, no hat. He carried a small suitcase which had been sent from Norway. In it were Norwegian toothpaste and soap, sandwiches, and 163 reichsmarks given to him by the Escape Committee. We caught the 2:04 train to Frankfurt an der Oder. Our papers stated that we were Norwegian electricians from the Arbeitslager [labor camp] in Frankfurt working in the vicinity of Sagan. For the journey from Frankfurt to Stettin we had other papers ordering us to change our place of work from Frankfurt to Stettin, and to report to the Birgermeister of Stettin.' Bergsland and Müller made it to the nearby town of Sagan, where they caught a train to Stettin in Germany (now: Szczecin, Poland). At the port, the pair were snuck onto a neutral Swedish ship by friendly sailors and made it to the safety of Gothenburg. There, they entered the British consulate, who arranged travel by train to Stockholm, where they were flown to Scotland from the Bromma airport. From there they were sent by train to London and shortly afterwards to 'Little Norway' in Canada.



See AB269 Liby


Signed Cover
26 BergRolf Arne Obsltn.1917-11-27 OrkangerNorwayPilotDSO

DFC

St. Olav Medal with Oak

War Cross With Sword

Krigsmedaljen
RNoAFFighter Command132 WING1945-02-02SPITFIRELF.IXPV181RAB6 + 2 probablesB79 WoensdrechtArmed RecceFailed To Return GERMAN Ground fire , BE-NE-LX unk, Crash near airfield EeldeKilled Age 27Initially buried in Holland, later repatriated to Orkanger Norway 1945

Memorial in Holland








Orkanger Kirke Norway



Memorial, Holland
BERG, ROLF ARNE, lieutenant colonel, Orkanger. By Ragnvald Daniel Berg and Anna Marie. Middle School, Army Flight School at Kjeller. Before the war he was employed in the air force, first at Værnes, later in Bardufoss. Participated in the war as a fighter pilot and died in a daring attack on a German airport near Groningen, Holland, February 3, 1945. Decorated with the War Cross with Sword, the St. Olavs Medal with oak branch and the British awards DSO and DFC

Aircraft hit by groundfire when strafing.

D-Day saw Norwegian squadrons to the fore, including experienced pilots such as Ragnar Dogger, Olav Ulstein (N5171), Nils Jørstad (another Skebrea veteran) and Birger Tidemand-Johannessen (the latter would go on to write a book about his experiences as a fighter pilot during World War Two). 332 Squadron was led by Werner Hosewinckel Christie from Vang in the county of Hedmark. Christe had been with 332 Squadron going back to the Catterick days, and was yet another experienced pilot. 332 had other experienced pilots in Dane Kjeld Rønhof, Erik Westly, Jon Ryg among others. The Wing was led by Wing Commander Rolf Arne Berg, a highly respected 27-year old from Orkanger, Norway. Berg had been with the Squadron ever since it’s early days and had proved himself in combat, as well as in leading his men. Berg was highly thought of by all his pilots, and was very well liked. Compared to the English system, which did not approve of pilots staying with their Squadron when they were promoted, the Norwegians did not adopt this system and kept their pilots. Men like Berg and Lundsten would therefore stay with the Squadron all the way from lower ranks up until Squadron Leader (Lundsten) and even Wing Commander (Berg). This system proved to be just as good, if not better, than the English one.

Rolf Arne Berg led the 132 (N) Wing into the continent until his death in February 1945. His tour of duty had been completed, but he managed to talk his way into flying one more sortie. It would be his last.

Norwegian 331 Squadron pilots in November 1942. On top: Johannes Greiner, Martin Gran. Second row, l-r: Helge Sognnæs (died 1943), Leif Lundsten (d. 1944), Stein Sem (d. 1942), Knut Bache (d. 1944), Anton C. Hagerup (d. 1943), Rolf Arne Berg (d. 1945), the Squadron's Intelligence Officer Philip Yatman, Rolf Engelsen and Svein Heglund. Bottom: Reidar Haave Olsen (d. 1944), Kristian Nyerrød, Fredrik Fearnley (d. 1944) with Varg, Kaj Birksted from Denmark and Tarald Weisteen.



Funeral Orksanger Norway



Spitfire Vb 331 Sqd. Pilot Lt. Rolf Arne Berg Manston, 1942


Berg with personalized Spitfire

Norwegian Spitfire Foundation's Spitfire RAB
27 BergRolf Arne*Ltn. NorwayPilotRNoAFFighter Command331 Sqd Norwegian

1942-08-19SPITFIREVBM579FN-BNorth Weald14:25 - unkDieppe RaidFailed To Return GERMAN A/C, FRANCE Fw190, Crashed into sea off DieppeSafeSEE PV181

Pilot bailed out and was rescued from the water by motor launch.

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