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Archive Report: Allied Forces

Compiled from official National Archive and Service sources, contemporary press reports, personal logbooks, diaries and correspondence, reference books, other sources, and interviews.
Further data available at Allied Losses & Incidents database

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No. 57 Squadron
06.12.1944 57 Squadron Lancaster I PD264 Fg.Off. William Riddell

Operation: Gießen, Germany

Date: 6th December 1944 (Wednesday)

Unit: 57 Squadron

Type: Lancaster I

Serial: PD264

Code: DX:K

Base: RAF East Kirkby, Lincolnshire

Location: Erdhausen, Germany

Pilot: Fg.Off. William Riddell 185681 RAFVR Age 22. Killed

Flt.Eng: Sgt. John Scott 644319 RAF Age 24. Survived (1)

Nav: Flt.Sgt. Peter Douglas Mann 1601233 RAFVR Age 23. Killed

Bomb Aimer: Flt.Sgt. Neil Francis Dallaway McGladrigan 426895 RAAF Age 22. Survived (1)

WOp/Air Gnr: Flt.Sgt. Frank Alexander Black 429371 RAAF Age 31. Killed

Air Gnr: Sgt. Robert Shaw McKillop 1826753 RAFVR Age 20. Killed

Air Gnr: Sgt. J. Forward 1666426 RAFVR PoW No. 1279 *

* Stalag Luft 7, Bankau near Kreuzberg, Silesia, Germany. (Now Bąków, Opole Voivodeship, Poland).

REASON FOR LOSS:

Lancaster PD264 took off from RAF East Kirkby at 16:39hrs and joined a force of 254 Lancasters and 10 Mosquitoes from 5 Group for a raid on Gießen. There were two targets for this night’s mission, the town centre and the railway yards.

PD264 or 61 Sqn Lancaster I ME725 was claimed by Ofw. Peter Tiedemann, his 1st, from 10./NJG6, at 2,400m 20-30km north of Gießen at 20:25 hrs. (Nachtjagd War Diaries Volume 2 (April 1944 - May 1945) - Dr Theo E.W. Boiten & Roderick J. Mackenzie).

Three of the crew managed to bail out and were seen to land safely.

Flt.Sgt. McGladrigan (Courtesy of Australian National Archives) and Sgt.McKillop (Courtesy Sheila Brown)


Sgt Scott and Sgt. Forward (Courtesy Amy Hirons)

Lancaster Mk 1s awaiting for take off. Aerial view of Gießen after a night bombing raid (Courtesy of the Australian War Museum)

Sgt. Forward was taken prisoner and was processed through normal military channels and remained a PoW and was repatriated after hostilities had ceased. After he had been released WO. Forward reported that Flt.Sgt. McGladrigan and Sgt. Scott had bailed out of the aircraft before he did.

A team from the RAF Missing Research and Enquiry Unit (MREU) reported that four members of the crew killed in the German fighter attack or the crash were buried in the cemetery at the village of Erdhausen near the scene of the crash.

(1) On the 18th August 1945 one of the US War Crimes Investigation teams exhumed, examined and identified the body of an Allied airman that had been buried in a wood near the village of Gladenbach. A very detailed pathologist’s report determined that this body had two gun shot wounds to the head, one of which would have caused death. The investigating officer, from laundry marks, badges of rank and other items found on the body, identified the body as that of Flt.Sgt. McGladrigan.

During further inquiries it became apparent that another member of the crew had been killed in somewhat similar circumstances. The MREU report determined that the second person killed was Sgt. Scott. A British War Crime Investigation team then took over the enquiries into both cases, and the two investigation into the killings were incorporated into one.

On completion of the enquiries a Military Court was convened at HQ 5 Division in Brunswick, Germany from 22nd May to 30th May 1947.

From the 22nd May to the 29th May the court heard two charges against four German nationals. On the first charge all four were charged with committing a war crime, in that, they in the vicinity of Gladenbach, Germany on or about the 10th of December 1944, were concerned jointly with a Karl Menge in the killing of Flt.Sgt. N.F.D. McGladrigan, RAAF, a PoW.

On the second charge only one of the four was charged with committing a war crime in that, he in the vicinity of Weidenhausen, Germany on or about the 7th of December 1944, were concerned jointly with a Karl Menge in the killing of Sgt. J. Scott, RAAF, a PoW.

Karl Menge was a Leutnant (2nd.Lt.) der Polizei who commanded the police posts in the area. He had not been apprehended and was not before the court.

The four accused were a Konrad Mangold, who was before the court on both charges, and who was a former Gendarmerie (Rural police) Bezirks-Oberwachtmeister (S/Sgt.), stationed in the village of Erdhausen. The following three were before the court on the first charge only; Ludwig Will who was a former member of the Landwacht (Auxiliary Police) from Erdhausen, Karl Schmidt who was a former Gendarmerie Meister (equates to M/Sgt.) stationed in the village of Erdhausen and Otto Koch who was a former conscripted member of the Gendarmerie from Bekelshausen.

From the 28th May to the 30th May 1947 the court heard a further two charges against one German national.

Ludwig Michel, who was the former Bürgermeister (Mayor) of Weidenhausen, was before the court to face two charges in committing a war crime, in that, he in the vicinity of Weidenhausen, German, on or about the 7th December 1944, in violation of the laws and usages of war was firstly concerned in the killing and secondly with the ill-treatment of Sgt. J. Scott, RAAF, a PoW.

The court heard that after the aircraft was shot down the Landwacht were turned out to search for members of the crew who had parachuted from the aircraft. The day after the crash, in the afternoon of the 7th December it was reported to Mangold that an airman had been captured near Wommelshausen, he in turn reported this to Menge who ordered Mangold to collect the prisoner. Menge and Schmidt met Mangold and the prisoner on the road from Wommelshausen to Weidenhausen. Menge told Mangold to shoot the prisoner there and then.

Mangold refused to do so after which Menge told him to take the prisoner away and interrogate him. The prisoner was taken to the office of Ludwig Michel, the Bürgermeister of Weidenhausen.

The court heard that after Mangold had arrived with the prisoner at Michel’s office at Weidenhausen an attempt was made to interrogate the airman without receiving any reply. As Mangold was under orders to report to Menge at a nearby inn the airman was incarcerated in the village community cell.

Whilst there it was claimed that the airman knocked on the door and called out. A crowd of people standing around outside drew this to the attention of Michel who arrived and opened the cell door, beckoned the airman to him and asked what he wanted. Michel was then seen to bludgeon him with a truncheon or a small whip. The airmen fell to the ground and Michel struck him a few more times before leaving.

When Mangold returned he told Michel that the airman was to be shot and that he was to help by arranging for a grave to be prepared. Michel directed a Heinrich Thomas, a witness for the prosecution, to make ready a grave in a hole known to exist in some ground just outside the village. Later that evening Michel and Mangold took the airman to the prepared grave where Mangold shot and killed him. The two of them and Thomas buried the airman in the grave.

In 1945 Sgt. Scott’s remains were exhumed and reinterred in the Gladenbach Cemetery.

The court heard that a second member of the crew had been captured near the village of Mornshausen, near Biedenkopf on the 7th December. The capture was reported to Koch who collected the airman, however, as there was no gaol available Koch took the airman to the office of the Mornshausen Bürgermeister and spent the night there. It appears that Koch treated the airman well. The next day Koch reported the capture of the airman to Menge and then took the airman the Landratsamt (District administrative office) so that he could be interrogated. However, as there was no one available to undertake the interrogation Koch took the airman to the gaol in Biedenkopf.

The next day, on the 9th December, Koch was to have taken the airman by train to Dulag Luft, Wetzlar to be processed through normal military channels as a PoW. However, events conspired against them and they missed the train so the airman was returned to the gaol at Biedenkopf after which Koch reported to Menge that they had missed the train.

Later that day Menge went to the Landratsamt and telephoned Mangold, who was at Biedenkopf and gave orders to be passed on to Schmidt which in effect was that the airman in the custody of Koch was to be shot. Schmidt was to prepare a grave in a convenient place and also to accompany Mangold and assist in the shooting. Koch was to take the airman somewhere near Gladenbach on the boundary of their respective districts.

As Schmidt could not be contacted by telephone Mangold personally went to him the next morning, on the 10th December, and passed on the orders from Menge. Schmidt told Mangold that Will would assist him and that he was to go to Will’s home to tell him of Schmidt’s orders. During that afternoon Will dug a grave in the woods outside of Gladenbach.

Menge ordered Koch to take the airman, under cover of darkness, from Biedenkopf along the road to Gladenbach to meet Mangold at the boundary of their respective police districts and hand over the airman to him. However, when Koch and the airman arrived at the location there was no one waiting so they continued on toward Gladenbach. Sometime between 21:30 and 22:00 hrs they where stopped by Mangold and Will. The group continued on for just over ½ mile and about 1¾ miles north of Gladenbach they turned off the road into the woods. The exact events that transpired next were unclear but what was not in dispute was that someway into the woods the airman was stopped and shot in the head by Mangold which appeared not to have been fatal and a second shot was fired killing the airman. What was not clear is who fired the second shot but the prosecution alleged that this was fired by Will. The murdered airman’s property was taken, his body carried to the grave which had been prepared that afternoon and buried there.

In 1945 Flt.Sgt. McGladrigan’s remains were exhumed from this grave and reinterred in the Gladenbach Cemetery.

Mangold was found guilty on both charges and sentenced to death by shooting which was later commuted to 20 years imprisonment and he was released in 1953. Will was sentenced to 10 years imprisonment. Schmidt was found guilty of complicity in the crime and was sentenced to 1 year imprisonment. The final disposition of the sentences for Will and Schmidt are unknown. Koch was found not guilty.

The court found Michel guilty of the charges. After considering the alleged mistreatment of the airman and his role at the shooting of the airman Michel was sentenced to 12 years imprisonment. He was released in July 1953 on the expiration of his remission for good conduct and in consideration of the time he had been held before his trial.

Burial details:

Initial Grave marker for Flt.Sgt. McGladrigan; Hanover War Cemetery; Sgt. McKillop on the family Headstone at the Ballengeich Cemetery.

Memorial plaque at East Kirby for Flt.Sgt. McGladrigan (Courtesy Sheila Brown) and Sgt Scott at Lossiemouth War Memorial (Courtesy Kate Tame).

Fg.Off. William Riddell. Reinterred in Hanover War Cemetery, Collective grave 11.E.1-4. Born on the 9th May 1922 in Fintray, Aberdeenshire. Son of William and Mary Riddell of Kemnay, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Grave inscription reads: "AT THE GOING DOWN OF THE SUN AND IN THE MORNING WE WILL REMEMBER HIM".

After a period of time at Inverurie school, William studied as an engineer at Aberdeen University before entered the RAF in 1942. He is remembered on the Aberdeen University Roll of Honour.

Sgt. John (Speedie) Scott. Reinterred in Hanover War Cemetery, Grave 11.E.5. Son of John and Jessie Scott of Lossiemouth, Morayshire, Scotland. Grave inscription reads: "HE GAVE HIS ALL, THE COST WAS DEAR AND THOSE HE LOVED LOVE HIM DEARER STILL".

Flt.Sgt. Peter Douglas Mann. Reinterred in Hanover War Cemetery. Collective grave 11.E.1-4. Son of Arthur Douglas Mann and Elsie Mann of Wimbledon Park, Surrey, England. At the time of his death Peter's address was Kingstone Camelsdate, Haslemere, Surrey, England. Grave inscription reads: "IN MEMORY OF A BELOVED SON AND BROTHER. UNTO THY NAME O LORD, BE GLORY GIVEN".

Flt.Sgt. Neil Francis Dallaway McGladrigan. Reinterred at the Hanover War Cemetery, Grave 11.E.6. Born on the 8th December 1922, Brisbane, Queensland. Son of William Patrick and Doris Vida May McGladrigan of Kallangur, Queensland, Australia. Grave inscription reads: "DEARLY LOVED AND SADLY MISSED BY DAD, MUM AND BROTHER ROB".

Neil had enlisted on the 15th August 1942 and is remembered on the St. Joseph's Nudge College roll of Honour.

Flt.Sgt. Frank Alexander Black. Reinterred at the Hanover War Cemetery, Collective grave 11.E.1-4. Born on the 19th March 1913 in Brisbane. Son of Walter Samuel and Florence Elsie Black of East Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Sgt. Robert Shaw McKillop. Reinterred in Hanover War Cemetery, Collective grave 11.E.1-4. Son of William and Martha McKillop of Stirling.

Robert is also remembered on the family headstone in Ballengeich Cemetery, Stirling, Scotland and on the Holy Trinity Scottish Episcopal Church War Memorial in Stirling. Robert joined the RAF in 1942.

Initially researched by Kate Tame for Aircrew Remembered and dedicated to the relatives of this crew. Reviewed and updated by Ralph Snape and Traugott Vitz with additional thanks to Traugott for his work on the ‘VitzArchive’.

With special thanks to Donald Stewart - Lossiemouth Book of Remembrance, Sheila Brown - Holy Trinity Scottish Episcopal Church Stirling, Trove Digitised Newspapers, Aberdeen University, Imperial War Museum, Scottish War Graves Project, St. Joseph's Nudge College Brisbane. Thanks to Amy Hirons, the granddaughter of Sgt. Forward, for his photograph.

TV & RS 19.09.2020 - Update to narrative

Acknowledgements: Sources used by us in compiling Archive Reports include: Bill Chorley - 'Bomber Command Losses Vols. 1-9, plus ongoing revisions', Dr. Theo E.W. Boiten and Mr. Roderick J. Mackenzie - 'Nightfighter War Diaries Vols. 1 and 2', Martin Middlebrook and Chris Everitt - 'Bomber Command War Diaries', Commonwealth War Graves Commission, Tom Kracker - Kracker Luftwaffe Archives, Michel Beckers, Major Fred Paradie (RCAF) and MWO François Dutil (RCAF) - Paradie Archive (on this site), Jean Schadskaje, Major Jack O'Connor USAF (Retd.), Robert Gretzyngier, Wojtek Matusiak, Waldemar Wójcik and Józef Zieliński - 'Ku Czci Połeglyçh Lotnikow 1939-1945', Anna Krzystek, Tadeusz Krzystek - 'Polskie Siły Powietrzne w Wielkiej Brytanii', Franek Grabowski, Norman L.R. Franks 'Fighter Command Losses', Aircrew Remembered Databases and our own archives. We are grateful for the support and encouragement of CWGC, UK Imperial War Museum, Australian War Memorial, Australian National Archives, New Zealand National Archives, UK National Archives and Fold3 and countless dedicated friends and researchers across the world.
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