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RAF Battle of Britain Consolidated Database
3094+ Entries in Database
THIS DATABASE IS CURRENTLY UNDER DEVELOPMENT
Read Search Tips. Blue = Sort Column. Corrections and Additions via Helpdesk please
NOTE: KIA = Killed In Action. WIA = Wounded In Action. KIFA = Killed in Flying Accident. = Jewish as per jewishvirtuallibrary.org
Fate In Battle is date of incident between July 10 1940 and October 31 1940. Fate After Battle is date of death after the Battle

The Battle of Britain clasp (worn on the 1939-45 Star – or a silver gilt rosette if medal ribbons only are worn) is restricted to aircrew from 71 defined units
of RAF Fighter Command, Coastal Command or the Fleet Air Arm, who flew at least one operational sortie between 00:01 July 10 1940 and 23:59 October 31 1940.

To see a larger database covering the entirety of WWll, refer to our Allied Losses and Incidents database. This database is the result of research into all known sources of information on the crews which fought the Battle of Britain on the Allied side. It is surprising that for the most significant air battle of WW2, and even after 80+ years, there remains any uncertainty at all about who took part and in some cases, what they did. We have made it our objective to develop this database into a most comprehensive and accurate record which brings to life those heroic deeds. You can help: send corrections and additional information via our Helpdesk.
We believe this database to be among the most useful records extant in terms of its searchability: for example, it is easy to determine all Blenheim crews, or losses on a specific date or the members of a particular squadron.

Readers are referred to the following sites which we have used to cross-check information and we acknowledge and thank them as respected sources for some of the material in this database:
VintageWings.ca: comprehensive listing of artworks
bbm.org: Comprehensive listing of RAF personnel and service records
Wikipedia: Life stories of leading pilots and crew
AircrewRemembered Paradie Canadian Archive Database: 45,000 Service Records of RCAF personnel
AircrewRemembered Allied Losses and Incidents Database: Covering 120,000+ Allied aircrew 1939 - 1945
AircrewRemembered Archiwum: specialist database with details of Polish personnel (in Polish)
AircrewRemembered Kracker Luftwaffe Archive: 31,000 Luftwaffe pilot and crew details
AircrewRemembered LOST: Rob Philips Memorial Archive: Dutch losses in Europe
bel-memorial.org: Comprehensive site on Belgian aircrew

You can now search on 2 Characters minimum (previously 3). To search for a single character Squadron append 'Sqd'. Thus Search on '5 Sqd'


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You searched for: “canada

#Name (↑)First NamesRankService No.Air ForceCountry of Origin* (↑)SquadronsAwardsAircraft (↑)VictoriesFate in BattleFate After BattleDateOfDeathNotesPhoto
1 AndrewsMaurice RaymondSgtNZ/40615RNZAFNew Zealander264 Sqd

Defiant

Wikipedia discussion of Defiant tactics
SurvivedPassed away 24th March 1971Enlisted 11th March 1940 at the age go 29. Air Observer's School (Ohakea) Trainee Air Gunner 5 OTU (Operational Training Unit) June 1940 (Ashton Down) 13 ITW (Initial Training Wing- Pilot training) August 22 1942 26 EFTS (Elementary Flying Training School) Canada - various training schools March 1943 - Qualified as twin-engine pilot in January 1944. In March 1944, repatriated to NZ. He was posted as a staff pilot to the School of Navigation and Reconnaissance at new Plymouth where he was eventually appointed Flight Commander. He was transferred to Reserve on December 24 1945 and returned to his garage business. Pilot Officer 3 June 1942 - Flight Officer 3 December 1942 - Flight Lieutenant 3 June 1944. (Info courtesy AM New Zealand.
2 Baker-FalknerRoy SydneyLt Commander (FAA)FAACanadian812 NAS
DSO

DSC

MIA1944-07-18 Age 28Born 3 June 1916 in Nottingham, England, of Canadian parents. His father was stationed in Britain with the 79th Battalion Canadian Expeditionary Force. The family returned to Canada in early 1918. Mid 1929 applied to join the Navy at Esquimalt naval base, British Columbia. Transferred to UK on a Canadian Commonwealth Scholarship. In 1937 he transferred to the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm as a pilot, completing his pilot training with the Royal Air Force. Baker-Falkner earned his pilot's wings in 1938 with the rank of Sub-Lieutenant RN/Flight Lieutenant RAF, and specialized in torpedo reconnaissance. To an operational carrier-based squadron in HMS Glorious in the Mediterranean. On the outbreak of war in September 1939, his Fairey Swordfish squadron was actively involved in the search for the German warship Graf Spee in the Indian Ocean. Returned to England in Spring 1940, supported the evacuation of troops from Dunkirk and later participated in the Battle of Britain. He was one of the few Canadian naval officers to participate in this battle. He then was seconded to RAF Coastal Command, flying the venerable Swordfish biplane in mining missions against the German coastline. DSO. After 15 months of operational duties, in August 1941 attached as a pilot instructor to the Fleet Air Arm air station at RNAS Condor in Arbroath, Scotland. CO of 767 NAS August 1942. Appointed Wing Leader of 8 Torpedo Bombing Reconnaissance Naval Air Wing, which consisted mainly of young Australian, British, Canadian and New Zealand Volunteer Reserve aircrews. The Wing joined the carrier HMS Furious in the Orkney Islands off Scotland in February 1944. Led the Wing on an air strike against enemy shipping in north Norway, supported by the Home Fleet and three Canadian Tribal class destroyers, HMC Ships Iroquois, Haida and Athabaskan. 30 March 1944, No. 8 Naval Air Wing embarked from Hatston in Scotland to the Fleet carriers HMS Furious and HMS Victorious to lead Operation Tungsten, an air attack on the giant German battleship Tirpitz, anchored in a Norwegian fjord. Led an audacious low-level dive-bombing attack against Tirpitz on 3 April 1944.The air strike of 121 aircraft, including 40 Barracuda and 40 Wildcats, was a success; Baker-Falkner's Wing shared 14 dive-bombing hits, crippling Tirpitz. This decisive action prevented Tirpitz from posing a major threat in the forthcoming invasion of Normandy by the allies in June 1944. 18th July 1944 Baker-Falkner was launched on the first anti-submarine patrol. Flying a Barracuda II aircraft with the serial LS556 5K, he was assisted by his Observer, Lt. GN Micklem, and his tactical Air Gunner (TAG), PO AH Kimberley. A Corsair of 1841 squadron flown by the senior pilot, Sub Lt. HS Mattholie, escorted his Barracuda. Weather worsened and Baker-Falkner's Barracuda and the Corsair failed to find the Fleet and became separated. Baker-Falkner and his crew were lost at sea. Sub Lt Mattholie crash-landed in Norway and was subsequently taken prisoner. Sub Lt. Mattholie's successor as senior pilot in 1841 squadron was Lt. Robert Hampton Gray RCNVR, who was later to posthumously earn the Victoria Cross in the Pacific.Lee on Solent Memorial

3 BartonRobert Alexander 'Butch'Flt LtCanadian249 Sqd

OBE

DFC

Hurricane14Survived war2 September 2010Wounded on 1940-09-15 at 15:30hrs. He was shot down in his Hurricane I (V6625) over Shell Haven, Essex by a Bf 109.Retired Feb 1959 as Wing Commander 2010 Born Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada, 7 June 1916

Paradie Canadian Archive Database

“Butch” Barton joined the Royal Air Force at age 19, travelling to England to take a short service commission. He started his career before the war on biplane fighters with 41 Squadron. With the outbreak of the war, Barton joined 249 Squadron flying Hurricanes at RAF Boscombe Down. He became a flight commander with 249 during the Battle of Britain, once bailing from his Hurricane after it was hit from return fire from a Dornier Do 17 bomber. By the end of the Battle of Britain, he was awarded a DFC for his “outstanding leadership”. With 249 Squadron, he also took part on the air war over Malta, adding to the total of his victories. Under Barton’s leadership, 249 Squadron became one of the most respected and lethal units on Malta and in the RAF. By war’s end he was a Wing Commander with 14 victories to his credit. The Battle of Britain London Monument web page says this about Barton: “During his career he had always tried to maintain the highest standards of chivalry, once severely reprimanding an inexperienced colleague who had finished off a damaged German aircraft, killing the pilot as he was attempting to crash-land over England... “Butch” Barton died on 2nd September 2010. His ashes were scattered on his favourite lake in British Columbia on the morning of 15th September, Battle of Britain Day.”



4 BeamishFrancis VictorWg Cdr16089RAFIrish151 Sqd

249 Sqd

56 Sqd

DSO

DFC
HurricaneMIA1942-03-28 Age 39Born 1903-09-27 at Dunmanway Ireland. Cranwell in the Autumn of 1921 as a flight cadet where he learned to fly. Born leader of men, a superb pilot and instructor.

born in County Cork in 1903, well before the births of most of the pilots of the Battle of Britain. As such, he felt the full impact of the First World War on families in Great Britain. He was one of three brothers who went on to outstanding careers in the RAF. His brother George, a gifted professional rugby player would attain the rank of Air Marshal and his brother Charles, also a rugby player, would become a Group Captain. Beamish attended the RAF College at Cranwell in 1921 and upon graduation, he joined No. 4 Army Cooperation Squadron at RAF Farnborough, flying the Bristol Fighter. After a period as an instructor at Cranwell, he was exchanged for an RCAF officer and spent two years in Canada before returning to lead a flight in 25 Squadron. He came down with tuberculosis in 1933 and was retired from active service with the air force. RAF to the bone, Beamish was decidedly unhappy about his forced retirement and took up a series of civilian positions with the RAF Volunteer Reserve. He recovered his health fully by the beginning of 1937 and was reinstated as a flying Flight Lieutenant. He began his “comeback” in command of the new Meteorological Flight at RAF Aldergrove (for which he was awarded the Air Force Cross) and finally he rejoined a combat-ready squadron when he took command of 64 Sqd at RAF Church Fenton at the end of 1937. At the outset of the Second World War, at the ripe old age of 36, he took command of 305 Sqd. Though he was a very good squadron commander and aggressive pilot, he also had recognized staff and administration skills, and he then returned to Canada for staff duties which included an assessment of the Curtiss P-40 Kittyhawk fighter. He returned by the end of May, 1940 to take command of the wing at RAF North Weald. He flew operational sorties with his squadrons whenever possible and began to rack up victories against the Germans in the Battle of Britain. In July he was awarded the DFC and in November the DSO. As mentioned on the previous caption, he was involved in an air-to-air collision with “Ginger” Neil, necessitating a forced landing. He was damaged three times in combat and safely landed his Hurricane each time. He was then assigned command of the wing at RAF Kenley and, in February of 1942 while on patrol, spotted the German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen along with defensive ships making their famous, and ultimately successful, Channel Dash to safety in Wilhelmshaven. Two months later, he was killed in action while engaging the enemy near Calais. Runnymede Age 39

Rare colour drawing by Cuthbert Orde

5 BeardmoreEric Walter BPlt OffC/820RCAFCanadian1 Sqd (RCAF)

HurricaneBorn in Berlin. Shot down over the Thames Estuary on 1940-09-18 at 10:30hrs, baled out Hurricane I (P3859) slightly wounded. Hurricane crashed at Dungeness. Repatriated to Canada in 1941.
Paradie Archive
6 BedaAntoniSgtP-1900
793548
PAFPolish302 Sqd Polish
Krzyz Walecznych (x2)

Medal Lotniczy (x4)

Croix de Guerre (France)
HurricaneDiedBeda was in the Polish Air Force before the war. After the fall of Poland he escaped to France and joined the French Air Force. In May 1940 he was serving with Groupe de Chasse I/2. On the 10th he shared in probably destroying a He 111, on the 11th he shared in the probable destruction of two Ju 88s and on 5 June he shared a Hs 126. Made his way to England. RAFVR and eventually joined 302 Squadron Polish (Hurricanes) at Leconfield on 20 August 1940. OTU converting to Hurricanes. Posted from 302 to 87 Sqd on 27 September 1941. 307 Sqd from 22 April 1942 and was commissioned in June. Beda was awarded the French Croix de Guerre. He later went on to transport duties with 301 Sqd. On 24 January 1946 posted to 304 Sqd. Left the PAF in December 1946 and went to the USA. He later moved to Canada, but was killed in a car crash in 1960.

Assigned to 302 Sqd- 01.07 / 31.10.1940 he actively participated in the Battle of Britain. In 1941 he was sent to 87 Sqd RAF and in April 1942 to 307 Sqd. Then flew in RAF 216 Sqd. In 1945 assigned to 301 Sqd and in January 1946 to 304 Sqd Coastal Command.
Archiwum Database


7 Bell-WalkerHoward JohnSgt103515RAFVRBritish64 Sqd

72 Sqd

602 Sqd

MBE

SpitfirePoW. Survived War2nd November 1999 Ottowa, Ontario CanadaBorn 7th August 1920 Birmingham. Educated at Rynaby School, Banbury and Bloxham School. RAFVR in April 1939 as an Airman u/t Pilot at 8 E&RFTS Woodley. November 1939 to 7 EFTS Desford. 11th April 1940 posted to 10 FTS Ternhill on No. 19 Course. Qualified 24th July 1940. 5 OTU Aston Down on 3rd August on Spitfires, joined 64 Sqd at Leconfield on the 19th. To 72 Sqd at Croydon on 11th September. 14 September baled out after combat over Ashford. Spitfire K9960 burned out at Orlestone. Shot down 18 September in a surprise attack by Me109s on a squadron patrol over Gravesend. Seriously wounded and in hospital for some time. 25th November 1940 rejoined 64 Squadron at Kenley. Early 1941 posted to 602 Sqd at Prestwick . Commissioned August 1941. 12th August 1941 in Circus 70 a Hampden escort to Gosnay power station, flying as number two to the CO, S/Ldr. Al Deere. Surprised by Me109s and Bell-Walker was shot down in Spitfire Vb AB844 before he could break away. He baled out, wounded, and was captured. Held in Stalag Luft 3. Transferred into the Engineering Branch after the war. MBE 30th April 1954. Retired on 1st December 1967 as a Sqd Ldr.

On patrol on 1940-09-14 he baled out of Spitfire I (K9960) safely after combat over Ashford in Kent at 18:30hrs. On 1940-09-18 Spitfire I (R6704) badly damaged and he was badly wounded when he was attacked by Bf 109s over Gravesend, Kent at 10:30hrs. On 1941-08-12 he was shot down in Spitfire V by a Bf 109, wounded and captured while flying with 602 Sqd as No 2 to Sqd Ldr Al Deere.
8 BlatchfordHoward Peter 'Cowboy'Flt Lt37715RAFCanadian17 Sqd

257 Sqd

DFC
HurricaneMIA1943-05-03Wg Cdr shot down in combat over Netherlands; aged 31; Born Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, 25 February 1912; son of Kenneth A and Grace L Blatchford of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Remembered on Panel 118, Runnymede Memorial. Age 31
9 BoyleJohn Greer 'Beryl'Flying Officer40204RAFCanadian41 Sqd

SpitfireKIA1940-09-28KIA on 1940-09-28. Shot down in his Spitfire I X4426 over Charing, Kent at around 10:30hrs. Born Casselman, Ontario, Canada, 27 March 1914. Lynsted New Churchyard Age 26
10 BrownMark Henry 'Hilly'Fg Off37904RAFCanadian1 Sqd

DFC & Bar

Czech War Cross

Croix de Guerre (France)

Hurricane15KIA1941-11-12Joined RAF in 1936. In France 1 Sqd in Hurricanes where he shot down 5 enemy aircraft. Canada's first Ace of the War. Shot down on 1940-08-15 on patrol in Hurricane I (P3047) near Harwich at 15:00hrs. Baled out and slightly injured, rescued by a trawler. DFC. Rose to Wing Cmd. Killed on 1941-11-12. 15 confirmed kills 4 shared. Buried Sicily. Catania War Cemetery Age 29 See:
RCAF Notes
Archive Report
Paradie Archive


11 BrownMarvin KitchenerPlt Off42101RAFCanadian242 Sqd

85 Sqd

HurricaneKIA1941-02-21 Age 25Born Kincardine, Ontario, Canada. RAF March 1939. Posted to 242 Sqd at Church Fenton on 6th November. To France on 16th May 1940 attached to 85 Sqd. Two days later, in combat with Me110's of I/ZG76 near Le Cateau, he was shot down in Hurricane N2320 LE-H with bullet wounds in the right leg. Evacuated to England, rejoined 242 on 13th July under Sqd Ldr Douglas Bader. On a local flight in Hurricane N2476 on 21st February 1941 he crashed at Grange Farm, Alderton, Suffolk and was killed. Buried Ipswich New Age Cemetery England

Paradie Archive Database


12 BudzińskiJanSgt780665PAFPolish605 Sqd

145 Sqd

Krzyz Walecznych (x2)

Medal Lotniczy

Hurricane2Died1981-04-01RAF 145 Sqd in Westhampton in August 1940. Battle of Great Britain in 605 Sqd and 145 Sqd. In April 1941 transferred to 302 Sqd at Kenley. Then a pilot instructor at No. 16 Polish Pilot School in Newton. After demobilization in 1953, he went to Canada where he worked as an inspector in a jet engine factory. In 1958 he went to California, USA - died in South Bend WA USA
Archiwum Database

13 CalderheadGeorge DouglasPlt Off86333RAFVRBritish54 Sqd

SpitfireKIA1942-01-12Sherwood Cemetery Canada Age 23
14 CarthewGerald Charles TrewallaPlt OffRAFCanadian253 Sqd

85 Sqd

145 Sqd

Hurricane0.5Died2013-07-12Born 1921-04-16 at Mountain Park, Alberta, Canada. He joined the RAF on a short service commission and began training on 26th June 1939. 6 OTU Sutton Bridge on 5th April 1940, converted to Hurricanes and then joined 17 Sqd at Hawkinge on 12th May. Moved briefly to 213 Sqd at Biggin Hill, then joined 229 Sqd on 20th May, went to 85 Sqd at Debden on the 25th and finally to 253 Sqd at Kirton-in-Lindsey on 6th June. Shared in the destruction of a Do17 on 11 September 1940. To 145 Sqd at Tangmere on 14 October. Last sortie on 16 October. 1940, then into non flying duries
15 ChałupaStanisław JózefPlt OffP-1300PAFPolish302 Sqd Polish
Virtuti Militari

Krzyz Walecznych

Medal Lotniczy (x2)

Croix de Guerre

Hurricane4DiedIn France, after training at the Montpellier Base in March 1940, he flew intensely fighting Luftwaffe bomb expeditions. Evacuated to England, he flies in 302 Sqd during the Battle of Britain. During fight on August 20, 1940 with Ju88 bombers he shot down one plane for sure and the other probably. However, his Hurricane was shot in battle, crashing to a forced landing. The pilot was so seriously injured that after leaving the hospital he could not fly operationally. He shot down four planes. After the war, he emigrated to Canada. In 1990 he returned to Poland. He died in Katowice. He was buried in the military cemetery in Rakowice-Kraków. His Croix de Guerre from 1940 received in 2000
Archiwum Database


16 ChristieGeorge PattersonFg Off40081RAF (RAFO)Canadian242 Sqd

66 Sqd
DFC
Spitfire/BlenheimWIAKIA1942-07-05Wounded 1940-09-05 at 16:00hrs. Spitfire I (K9944) crashed at Gillingham, Kent after combat with Bf 109s over the northern part of Kent. Pointe Claire Lakeview Memorial Gardens Age 24
17 CochraneArthur Charles 'Cocky'Plt Off42195RAFCanadian257 Sqd

DFC
HurricaneMIA1943-03-31 Age 24Born 1919 Vernon, British Columbia, Canada. Short service commission in 1939. Joined 263 Sqd in April of 1940 flying Gloster Gladiators against the Germans in Norway. The squadron suffered terrible losses in that campaign. Not possible to discover if Cochrane participated. By 23 May posted to 257 Sqd on Spitfires at RAF Hendon. Operational in June, the unit moved to RAF Northolt. Cochrane was seriously injured in a car crash, spending considerable time in hospital and it wasn’t until August of 1942 that he returned to operational flying, this time with 87 Sqd, a Hurricane unit at RAF Charmey Down. To North Africa with 87 Squadron. DFC in March of 1943. He failed to return from a fighter patrol near Tunis on 31 March 1943. Malta Memorial

Paradie Canadian Archive



18 CopelandNorman DowneySgt54595British23 Sqd

235 Sqd

272 Sqd

404 Sqd (RCAF)

HurricaneSurvived warBelfast 30th December 2014.Born 1 February 1917. Joined the RAF on 16th March 1938 as an Aircrafthand. Posted to No. 1 Electrical and Wireless School at Cranwell for a wireless operators course. Joined 23 Sqd at Wittering. Remustered as Airman u/t WOp/AG. Sent to RAF Manby for an air gunnery course. On 23 May 1940 Copeland posted to 235 Sqd Bircham Newton. He went with his flight to Aldergrove on 19th November where it combined with a flight from 236 Sqd to reform 272 Sqd. Joined 404 Sqd (RCAF) Thorney Island on 25 May 1941. Posted to Canada on 7th April 1942 to be an instructor at 31 OTU Wibert, Nova Scotia. Returned to UK November 1943. To 12 ACS Bishopscourt, Northern Ireland. Commissioned December 1943. To 13 AGS Ballah, Egypt in late May 1944 then to Quastina in Palestine. Posted to Pamanzi in the Comoro Islands group in the Indian Ocean at war's end. Repatriated December 1945 and released in January 1946.
19 CorbettGeorge HenryPlt Off81366RAFVRCanadian66 Sqd

SpitfireKIA1940-10-08 Age 21Wounded 1940-09-09 at 18:00hrs. Baled out of Spitfire I (N3049) over East Grinstead after being shot down by a Bf 109. Killed 1940-10-08 at 09:30hrs. Spitfire I (R6779) was shot down by a Bf 109 near Chatham, crashed at Bayfors Marshes. Upchurch St Mary Churchyard England

Born November 4, 1919 Saskatchewan Canada. On a family holiday to England he applied to the de Havilland Aircraft Company’s Aeronautical Technical School at Hatfield, Hertfordshire. Joined RAFVR in November 1937. Training at No. 9 Advanced Flying Training School, posted to No. 7 OTU at Hawarden, Cheshire, on July 7, 1940 on Spitfires. July 26 reported to 66 Sqd at Coltishall, Norfolk. First true combat experience on September 9, 1940, and it was not a pleasant experience. Dodging often heavy rain showers, Pilot Officer Corbett was part of a group attacking German bombers, escorted by enemy fighters, intent on attacking London. After already damaging a Messerschmitt 109, he was positioning his aircraft for a rear attack on a bomber when he was bounced by three German fighters. With the cockpit filling with smoke and the controls jammed, he found himself in a severely damaged, uncontrolled aircraft plummeting toward the ground in a tight spiral dive. At 12,000 feet (3,658 metres), he bailed out, suffering a slight injury in the process. September 27 intercepted German bombers attacking London. In the midst of heavy British defensive fire from anti-aircraft guns below, he got a quick burst into one bomber before breaking off the attack and leaving the damaged enemy aircraft to other RAF fighters. He then selected a lone Junkers 88 as his next target, closed to within yards of the German aircraft, and opened fired. The enemy aircraft fell away, its port engine burning fiercely, but the smoke was so thick that Corbett had to break off the attack. His Spitfire was damaged by friendly fire when an artillery shell burst nearby, destroying one elevator and riddling the fuselage and starboard wing with shrapnel. He skillfully executed a forced landing in the London district of Orpington, emerging from his damaged but repairable Spitfire with a new-found respect for anti-aircraft gunners and a Junkers 88 claimed as destroyed. On October 8, 1940, Pilot Officer Corbett, wearing a new watch sent by his parents as a 21st birthday gift, was climbing with his squadron to intercept yet another formation of German raiders when they were surprised by a large number of Messerschmitt 109s. In a slashing attack, Corbett and one other 66 Squadron pilot were shot down near Bayford Marches, Upchurch; neither pilot survived. The Reverend William Joseph Wright was at his church, St. Margaret of Antioch, and witnessed the dogfight. When Corbett’s aircraft crashed, the clergyman ran to the site, hoping to provide assistance. But “…it was clear, due to the bullet damage around the cockpit, that the pilot had been killed instantly before the crash. I offered prayers and a blessing, and stayed until the body was recovered. The pilot’s own parachute was used as a shroud.” Back in Canada, in a cruel twist of fate, his mother, Mabel, received a letter from her son days after being officially informed that he had been killed. Corbett wrote, “Having got out OK, my confidence has tremendously increased and I want you to be confident also. We’re seeing plenty of action here every day and I’ll be back in the fight tomorrow. The Jerries are a long way from getting supremacy in the air, and until they get it, there’ll be no invasion.”

Our heroes of the Battle of Britain clearly understood what they were fighting and sacrificing for.

Paradie Canadian Archive Database



20 CorbettVaughan BowermanFlt Lt (later Grp Cpt)C/299RCAFCanadian401 Sqd RCAF

DFC
HurricaneKIA1945-02-13Damaged Hurricane I (L1851) at Hornchurch during a scramble 1940-08-18 when he ran into a fuel bowser at 14:40hrs. Shot down by Bf 109s at 09:20hrs 1940-08-31, baled out of Hurricane I (P3869) over Gravesend but suffered burns. Later commanded 402 Sqd (the second RCAF Squadron). DFC 1942-02-13. KIFA killed in 1945-02-20, aged 33. Toronto St James Cemetery Canada. Age 33
21 DibnahRonald Harold 'Rolly'Plt OffRAFCanadian1 Sqd

242 Sqd

91 Sqd

HurricaneSurvived warFebruary 1990 CanadaPosted to 1 Sqd RAF in France on 27 April 1940, P/O Roland H "Rolly" Dibnah was wounded in the thigh in a combat over Ochamps on 29 May and made a forced-landing at Nancy. On 31 August, he damaged an Me 110 and on 6 September shared another destroyed. The Canadian was posted to 242 Sqd RAF at RAF Coltishall on 21 September, remaining with them until 30 December 1940. His subsequent service is currently unknown until January 1944 when Dibnah joined 91 Squadron at Tangmere. He transferred to the RCAF on 18th January 1945 and was released on 21st October 1947 as a Flight Lieutenant. He flew Vampires with the RCAF


Dibnah next to Spitfire
22 DixonChristopher Alexander WilfredSgt124628British601 Sqd

HurricaneSurvived war23 July 1977 Saskatchewan CanadaBorn 1919 in Northampton England. Joined the RAFVR June 1939 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up on 1st September 1939. 7 OTU Hawarden in mid-August 1940. Converted to Hurricanes, joined 601 Sqd at Debden on 4th September. Commissioned in April 1942 but nothing else recorded until he left RAF early 1944.
23 DonaldsonEdward Mortlock 'Teddy'Sqd Ldr (later Air Commodore)32043RAFBritish151 Sqd

CB

CBE

DSO

AFC & Bar

Legion of Merit (USA)

Hurricane5.5DiedOfficial Ace. Cranwell graduate took over Command 151 Sqd flying Hurricanes in November 1939. He shot down 5½ enemy aero planes up until August 1940.

Born Negri Sembilan, Federated Malay States in 1912. Educated at King’s School, Rochester, Christ’s Hospital and McGill University, Canada. Joined the RAF 1931. June 1932 posted to 3 Sqd at Upavon, flying Bristol Bulldogs. Won the Brooke-Popham Air Firing Trophy in 1933 and 1934 and led the aerobatic displays at Hendon in 1935 and 1937 and at the International Rally at Zurich in 1937. Posted to 1 Sqd Tangmere July 1936, as a Flight Commander. August at 7 FTS, Peterborough. November in command of 151 Sqd at North Weald. Fought in France in 1940 from Vitry advanced landing ground. On 17 May destroyed two Ju 87s, the next day a Bf 110 and on the 22nd a Ju 87 destroyed and probably a second. Over Dunkirk he shared a Ju 88 on 29 May, probably destroyed a Ju 88 on 1 June and destroyed a Bf 110 on the 2nd and two Bf 109s on the 8th. DSO. In late June. Baled out into the Channel, after combat with a Bf 109, rescued. On 14 July got a Bf 109 destroyed. Acting Wing Commander and posted from 151 on 3 August to be Chief Flying Instructor at 5 FTS, Sealand. In 1941went to USA to organise gunnery schools and teach combat techniques. AFC. In 1944, after a period at the Empire Central Flying School, commanded RAF Colerne, Wiltshire. He later commanded RAF Milfield, Northumberland. Early 1946 command of RAF High Speed Flight. On 7 September 1946 he broke the world speed record in a Gloster Meteor at 616 mph. Awarded the Britannia Trophy and a Bar to the AFC. US Legion of Merit. He retired from the RAF on 12 March 1961, as an Air Commodore. He was made CBE in 1953 and a CB in 1960. After his retirement, he was air correspondent for the Daily Telegraph until 1979. Died 2 June 2 1992. Buried in St Andrew’s churchyard, Tangmere.


24 EmenyClifford StanleySgtNZ/40204RNZAFNew Zealander264 Sqd

Defiant

Wikipedia discussion of Defiant tactics
SurvivedDied 6 October 2000Born 11 January 1920 - Died 6 October 2000 Ground Training School, Weraroa (15 January 1940) Air Observers School, Ohakea (February 1940) Pilot training (January 1942)- No 13 Initial Training Wing, Torquay. No 22 EFTS, Cambridge Empire Training Scheme, Canada (May 1942)- No. 37 SFTS & NO. 39 SFTS. Advanced Flying Unit (UK) No. 60 OTU Night Intruder Course (Mosquitos) (Info courtesy AM New Zealand)
25 FalkowskiJan PawelFg Off (later W/C)P-0493PAFPolish32 Sqd

Virtuti Militari

DFC

Krzyz Walecznych (x4)

Medal Lotniczy (x3)

Wound Badge (x2)
Hurricane9Survived war2001-01-27After the surrender of France on June 23, he arrived in Great Britain. Assigned to 32 Sqd RAF. Then he went to 315 Sqd as the commander of the "A" squadron from July 1941 to June 1942. Military College in Scotland. After graduation, appointed on 03.07.1943 as commander of 303 Sqd. In 1944 he was a joint officer on staff 1 Div. Panc. Gen. St. Maczka, and later from 31.01.1945 the commander of the 3rd Polish Wing. Shot down over the Netherlands, escaped from captivity and reached the Allied forces. After demobilization he went to Canada. - died in Peterborough ON Canada

Archiwum Database


26 FletcherAndrew WilliamSqd Ldr37280RAFCanadian235 Sqd

272 Sqd (CO)

DFC & Bar

MiD

BlenheimSurvived war1978Born Cardston, Alberta, Canada. Joined RAF July 1935. 5 FTS Sealand 28 September 1935. SHQ RAF Calshot 20 July 1936. 'B' Flight Commander 235 Sqd July 1940. DFC 22 October 1940. Commanded 272 Sqd November 1940. Mention in Despatches in January 1941. May 1941 sent to Middle East. Led detachment to Malta mid-July. 28 July destroyed four SM79s and damaged two CR42s on the ground at Borizzo airfield. 30 July destroyed three SM79s on the ground at Elmas airfield and on 28th September he probably shot down two enemy aircraft at night. October 1941 Fletcher was awarded a Bar to the DFC 31 October 1941. Released from the RAF in 1946. Returned to Canada, farming in Warner, Alberta.

Paradie Canadian Archive Database

27 FlindersJohn Layton 'Polly'Plt Off81333British32 Sqd

Hurricane5Died1998Born in Chesterfield, Derbyshire in 1917. He joined the RAF in 1936 on a four-year engagement as a direct entry pilot under training. After completing his training he served with 74 Sqd. Intended to join Imperial Airways at the end of his service, but the outbreak of war changed that plan. On 20 November 1939 part of a section which attacked and damaged a Do 17 off North Foreland. Posted to 32 Sqd at Biggin Hill in April 1940 as a Pilot Officer. Training Officer, responsible for acquainting new pilots with squadron flying and fighting procedures. He achieved success in the Battle of France, but on 23 May was shot down and reported missing, believed killed. In fact he had forced-landed in the area of Cap Gris Nez and got back to England by ship. He scored more victories during the Battle of Britain, including two Do 17s claimed shot down on 18 August. He later became an A1 instructor and was attached to the RCAF. He left the RAF, as a Squadron Leader, in 1945, served in the RAFVR, eventually emigrated to Canada.

Destroyed 2 before the start of the Battle and 3 during it including a Bf 110 1940-08-18 which crashed at Harbledown near Canterbury killing both crew members.

28 FordErnest GeorgeSgt81636RAFVRCanadian3 Sqd 232 SqdHurricaneKIA1942-12-10Calgary Burnsland Cemetery Canada Age 28
29 FreyJuliusz ArturFlt Lt (later Sqd Ldr)P-0322PAFPolish607 Sqd

Krzyz Walecznych

Medal Lotniczy (x3)

Hurricane1991-03-30After the fall of France, he was evacuated to Great Britain. After 5 OTU, he is assigned on October 11, 1940 to 607 Sqd RAF and later 303 Sqd. Where he fulfills the duties of a squadron commander, he fought in the Battle of Britain. From February 22, 1941, he was the 1st Commander of 316 Sqd - on March 18, 1943, he would join the 418 Sqd RCAF (Night Fighter). On December 28, 1943, after a short stay at the Polish Base in Blackpool, he was directed to the Air Defense Command in Great Britain. In 1944, on December 18 transferred to Fighter Command, where he took the position of deputy liaison officer. In 1946, after his release, he went to Canada.
Archiwum Database

30 GaunceLionel Manley 'Elmer'Flt Lt37632Canadian615 Sqd
DFC
HurricaneMIA1941-11-19 Age 25Gaunce came from the wide open Canadian Prairies at Lethbridge, Alberta near the Montana border, but was educated in Edmonton. He started out in the Loyal Edmonton Regiment of the Canadian Army, but soon applied for a short service commission with the Royal Air Force. He was accepted in 1936 and embarked for England and flight training. His first squadron was 3 Sqd at RAF Kenley. Here he flew the Bristol Bulldog, Gloster Gladiator and then the Hawker Hurricane. Gaunce was appointed a Flight Commander with 615 Churchill’s Own Squadron in France, flying the Gloster Gladiator. As the Germans invaded France, Gaunce and 615 were recalled to England for Hurricane conversion. During the Battle of Britain, he was shot down on 18 August, suffering slight burns. At this time he was awarded a DFC for “excellent coolness and leadership” among other things. He rejoined his squadron in a few days, but was again shot down in flames on 26 August. He was rescued from the sea, but sent to hospital suffering from shock. At the end of October, having recovered, he was given command of 46 Sqd at RAF Stapleford Tawney where he fought a rare Italian force attacking Great Britain, shooting down a Fiat CR20 fighter. He left 46 Sqd in December due to ill health, and upon his return to operational status, took over 41 Sqd at RAF Merston. He continued to fight and increase his score to ace status but was shot down by flak over the sea and killed in November of 1941. He was 25 years old. In Jasper National Park, Alberta, 7,500-foot Mount Gaunce is named in his honour.

With A.Eyre and Dutch Hugo destroyed 3 Bf 109s over the convoy 'Bosom' in mid July 1940. DFC 1940-08-11. Wounded 1940-08-18 at 13:15hrs in aHurricane I (P2966) in combat with Bf 109 near Sevenoaks in Kent. Baled out. Shot down again on 26 August 1940 at 15:15hrs by a Bf 109, baleding out of Hurricane I (R4111) off Herne Bay and was rescued. Promoted to Squadron Leader 41 Sqd. 1941-11-19 in the afternoon he was killed off St. Lo on a Rhubarb flying Spitfire Vb (AB858) Born Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, 20 September 1915: remembered on Panel 28 of the Runnymede Memorial

Paradie Canadian Archive Database


31 GnyśWladysławPlt OffP-1298PAFPolish302 Sqd Polish

316 Sqd Polish

317 Sqd Polish

Virtuti Militari

DFC

Krzyz Walecznych (x3)

Medal Lotniczy (x2)

Croix de Guerre (France)

Wound Badge
Hurricane3Died2002-02-28First Allied victor in Polish campaign 1939-09-01. After training on British equipment, he was sent on July 28 1940 to 302 Sqd. During July 28. - 31.10.1940 took active part in the Battle of Great Britain. On January 30, 1942, he was released from combat operations. From December 22, 1942, he again began to conduct combat flights in 302 Sqd. In February 1943 he became commander of 316 Sqd and from August 28, 1943 in 309 Sqd. In August 1944 he became the commander of 317 Sqd. On 27.08.1944 in the first combat flight which he performed as a squadron commander, he was shot down by the German Army. in the Rouen region of France. Wounded he gets captured. Sent to a prisoner-of-war assembly point in Amiens - he escaped and reached England with the help of the French resistance. After convalescence he served in RAF Fighter Command. After demobilization he went to Canada. In 1999, he was awarded the Commander's Cross with the Star of the Order of Rebirth. Polish (PR II *) - he died in St. Catherines ON Canada - buried at the Mount Osborne Cemetery in Beamsville Canada Age 90


Cover artwork by Tony Theobald shows a Fokker EV in Polish markings in 1919 which scored the Polish Air Force's first victory which was against the hostile Russians, the PZL IIc of 2nd Lt W Gnys who scored the first and second victories over the Luftwaffe on 1 September 1939, a Hawker Hurricane of No 303 Squadron during the Battle of Britain and a Supermarine Spitfire IX in D-Day invasion markings and Polish markings. Underneath a Polish built MiG 29 is shown to mark the new independent Polish Air Force after years of Soviet rule. The cover bears Polish Air Force 1918 - 1998 logo and the insignia of the 121st squadron, No 303 Squadron, No 316 Squadron and 1st Fighter Regiment which corresponds to the aircraft on the artwork.
Archiwum Database
Allied Losses Database
Review of Biography


32 Göttel (Goettel)WladysławFlt LtP-1115PAFPolish302 Sqd Polish
Krzyz Walecznych

Srebrny Krzyż Zasługi

Medal Lotniczy (x4)

AFC

Hurricane1966-08-31After training in 5 OTU (VII-VII 1940). In the Battle of Britain, he fought in 302 Sqd (August-November 1940), from where he was transferred to 1 AACU (December 1940-V 1941), and later to Polish aviation education. Died Canada Age 58
Archiwum Database

33 HairsPeter RaymondPlt Off76316RAFVRBritish501 Sqd

276 Sqd

MBE

Air Efficiency

MiD

Hurricane1.5Survived war24th August 2014 Age 99Born 10 July 1915 in Thornton Heath, Surrey England. Joined RAFVR January 1938 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Training at 19 E&RFTS Gatwick. To 6 FTS Little Rissington October 1939. Commissioned. On 28 December 1939 posted to 11 Group Pool St. Athan. Converted to Hurricanes. Joined 501 Sqd at Tangmere on 25 January 1940. Flew to France on 10 May. 14 May damaged a Do17 and shared in destroying another on the 15 May. Me109 destroyed on 5 September. Acquired the final polish at RAF Hawkinge by August 1940. With a shared victory scored in France, he was a case in point when no sooner pilots had taxied in than they slumped forward in their cockpits, as dead to the world as men under morphia. 'After eight scrambles in a day, you came up to write up your log book, and you just couldn't remember, beyond putting down the number of times you'd been up ... you couldn't remember at all.' He was posted to 15 EFTS Kidlington on 13 October 1940 as a flying instructor. To 2 CFS Cranwell for an instructors course on 23 February 1941 after which he moved to 11 FTS Shawbury on 14 April to instruct. 10 EFTS Weston-Super-Mare in May. Posted to Canada on 13 June as an instructor and assistant CFI. Mid-December 1943 returned to the UK and joined 276 Sqd Air Seaa Rescue at Harrowbeer. 5 May 1944 to 19 OTU Kinloss as OC Bomber Defence Training Flight. To India on 18 July 1945 on administrative duties. Released from the RAF on 30 October 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant. Mention in Despatches 14 June 1945. MBE 1 January 1946.


Signed envelope

34 HartJohn StewartFg Off41696RAFCanadian602 Sqd

54 Sqd

67 Sqd (CO)

DFC
Spitfire1.5Survived war2019-06-18 Age 102Born in Canada in 1916 and went on to serve in modern-day Myanmar and Italy, where he won the DFC for gallantry. Learnt to fly at Halifax Flying Club in Canada before joining the RAF in January 1939. The following year he joined 602 Sqd at RAF Westhampnett in West Sussex and he was scrambled on a daily basis. During his service, Sq Ldr Hart helped shoot down a Ju88 fast bomber off the East Sussex coast and a Me109 during a duel in the skies over Kent. There were also several close calls, including one incident when a Ju88 put a hole in his radiator at 20,000ft over the English Channel and he somehow limped back to base. Sqd Ldr Hart said: ‘You didn’t have time to be scared. You’re thinking about what’s going on. ‘I know I have the Battle of Britain medal with a star on it, but I really didn’t have that much to do with it. You were posted to a squadron and you did your job.’ Hart then had a stint as a flying instructor, before commanding 67 Sqd in Burma (Myanmar) in 1943 and 112 Sqd in Italy in March 1945. He led a formation of fighter planes in a successful attack on a railway line that ran from Italy into Yugoslavia and later a sortie that destroyed 11 transport locomotives.

Battle of Britain historian Andy Saunders said: ‘The debt that the nation and the free world owes to those heroes of the 'Few. can never be underestimated and it is terribly sad that the 'Few' are yet fewer. ‘They are our last living link to those desperate days of 1940, but the debt we owe does not lessen or diminish with their passing. ‘In their day, they were a band of brothers.’

David Brocklehurst MBE, chairman of the Kent Battle of Britain Museum, said in 2011: ‘John was the archetypal Battle of Britain pilot; very modest and self-effacing – the epitomy of what they stood for. ‘He should be remembered for his bravery. Many of these men said they were not heroes, just doing their duty, but we see them all as heroes. ‘Sadly they are a dying generation and there are only four of The Few still living. ‘It makes it all the more important that we carry on their legacy as there will be a time when they will no longer be able to do so. ‘What they achieved must never be forgotten.’

Paradie Canadian Archive Database

35 HerrickMichael JamesPlt Off (later Sqd Ldr)33566RAFNew Zealander25 Sqd

DFC & Bar
Blenheim10+MIA1944-06-16 Age 23Born 1921 in Hastings, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand. Learned to fly at a local civilian flying club. RAF College, Cranwell in England. Fast-tracked to fly night fighters, joining 25 Squadron in Bristol Blenheims. He was 18 years old. By September of 1940, he was first successful night fighter pilot of the war with three victories and a DFC. In October 1941, posted back to New Zealand as an instructor. Posted to 15 Sqd RNZAF. To Tonga, where they acquired the P-40 fighters from USAAF. Commanded 15 Sqd on Guadalcanal. Shot down the first enemy aircraft by a RNZAF fighter in the Second World War. Double ace at Guadalcanal and then took care of 300 Kiwi aircrew trainees as they sailed for Canada and the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. To UK where he joined 302 Polish Squadron as a Flight Commander on Mosquitos, flying night ops. In May of 1944, the squadron began Day Ranger operations and on the first of the unit’s such operations, Herrick’s Mosquito was shot down near Jutland. Herrick was killed after five years of operational flying. He was one of five brothers who fought in the second world war—himself and two others being killed—Brian, lost in the Battle of Britain flying 272 Sqd Blenheims and Dennis, flying Hurricanes with 53 Squadron—shot down off the coast of France in June 1941. Frederikshavn Cemetery Denmark
Portrait by Eric Kennington

36 HowleyRichard AlexanderPlt Off41705RAFNewfoundlander141 Sqd

Defiant

Wikipedia discussion of Defiant tactics
MIA1940-07-19

Archive Report

Only Newfoundlandler known to have flown in the Battle of Britain. Educated in Newfoundland and the UK. Flying lessons at the Sir Alan Cobham Flying School at Shoreham, Sussex. Joined the RAF on a short service commission. One of the first pilots to be posted to 141 Squadron, reforming at Turnhouse, Edinburgh with Gladiators and later Blenheims. Squadron switched to Defiants and moved to West Malling, Kent, often operating from the forward airfield at Hawkinge. On the morning of 19 July 1940, Howley was the pilot of one of nine Defiants attacked by Bf 109s off Dover. His aircraft was among six lost and he and his gunner, Sergeant A G Curley, were reported missing. Newfoundlander (but born in Victoria, Canada) in Defiants of 141 Sqd. 19 July 1940 he and his gunner (A.G.Curley) were on convoy patrol in Defiant (L6995), shot down off Dover, both killed by a Bf 109 of JG 51 at 12:45hrs. Runnymede

Paradie Canadian Archive Database





37 KawaleckiTadeusz WilhelmPlt Off76698PAFPolish151 Sqd

Medal Lotniczy (x3)

Hurricane1971-04-19Joined the RAF after escaping Poland. Posted to 151 Sqd 8 August 1940. From 01.07.-31.10.1940, he actively participated in the Battle of Great Britain in the 151DM RAF. During operational break he flew as a pilot in 1 AACU until November 1941, then as a pilot instructor in airport education. until May 1943. Staff May 1944 to May 1946. After demob. Canada. Tragford ON Canada died Age 56
Archiwum Database
38 KentJohn Alexander 'Johnnie'Sqd Ldr (later Grp Cpt)RAFCanadian303 Sqd

92 Sqd

Virtuti Militari

DFC

AFC
Hurricane13Died1985-10-07Born in Canada, Johnnie Kent spent most of his life in the United Kingdom. Became a pilot at 17 and held a commercial licence when he was 19. Joined the RAF in n1935 and flew Gauntlets with 19 Sqd. In September 1939 he joined 212 Sqd in France. His first victory was when a Bf 109 attacked him but could not pull out of its dive and went into the River Seine. There were no witnesses so he could not claim it. He became flight commander on Hurricanes with 303 Sqd Polish. So highly did the Poles regard Kent that they made him an honourary Pole and called him 'Kentowski'. He then commanded 92 Squadron on Spitfire I. In October 1940 he scored up his Squadron's 100th wartime victory.





39 KerwinJohn WilliamFg Off (later Sqd Ldr)C/922RCAFCanadian401 Sqd RCAF

Hurricane2WIAKIFA1942-07-16Pre-war member of the RAF. Joined No 1 RCAF Squadron in August 1940. 31 August he destroyed a Do 215. 1 September he destroyed another Dornier and a Bf 110. He was then shot down and he baled out of his Hurricane I (P3963) over Shipbourne at 14:25hrs, with burns. KIFA in KIA in the Aleutians on the 16 July 1942. Canada. Fort Richardson Post Cemetery Age 24

John Kerwin Medals

40 KilnerJoseph RichardSgt63783British65 Sqd

DFC

MiD
4 (minimum, some records at 7)Survived war11th May 1986Sent to Canada to instruct & brought his wife & child with Instructed at Medicine Hat, Alberta. DFC Citation London Gazette #36686 dated 1 September 1944: 'This officer has completed very many sorties and has shot down seven and assisted in the destruction of four more enemy aircraft. He has displayed great skill, courage and tenacity, qualities which were well illustrated on a recent occasion when he pressed home a most determined attack on an ammunition train in a railway siding. Considerable anti-aircraft fire was directed at his aircraft which was hit and an engine rendered useless. Nevertheless, Flight Lieutenant Kilner flew to an airfield in this country and effected a safe landing.'

Born in Beckenham, Kent England 11 October 1916. Educated at Christs College, Finchley and then Torquay Grammar School. Attended the de Havilland School of Flying at Hatfield from 24th August 1936 until 11th December 1937. The reserve scheme was subsumed into the RAFVR just as he left Hatfield for 5 ERFTS Hanworth. To 19 ERFTS Gatwick on 30 November 1938 and then 22 ERFTS Cambridge on 22 February 1939. Full-time service on 1st May 1939. To 65 Sqd at Hornchurch. 26 May 1940 Kilner shared a probable Ju88 near Calais. 28 May shared a Do17 near Dunkirk. 5 July he shared a He111, on 5th, 12th and 13th August got Me109 probables. 16 July got two Me109s and damaged another and on the 20th he got a Me109, probably another and damaged a Do17. 8 December 1940 to CFS Cranwell for an instructors course. Instructing at 14 SFTS Cranfield on 10 January 1941. 18 August 1941 he embarked on the 'Olaf Fostenes' with his wife, daughter and son. Arrived Montreal, Canada 28 August. To 34 SFTS, Medicine Hat, Alberta, instructed there until 30 October 1943 when he took up another post at 36 OTU Greenwood, Nova Scotia. After arriving back in UK at Liverpool on the 31 January 1944, posted to 1 Personnel Despatch Centre, West Kirby before 13 OTU Bicester on the 15 February for Mosquito conversion. To 21 Sqd at Hunsdon on 28 March 1944. Posting ended on 31st July 1944 with a staff position at HQ AEF in France. DFC 5 September 1944 credited with seven enemy aircraft destroyed and four shared. Released from the RAF on 31st July 1946 as a Squadron Leader.


41 KrasnodębskiZdzisławSqd LdrP-1505PAFPolish303 Sqd Polish

Virtuti Militari

Medal Lotniczy (x4)

Wound Badge
HurricaneWIADied1980-08-03Flew with Polish Air Force in the September of 1939 and saw the Germans bombing Warsaw. Flew to Bucharest where the Romanians impounded his aeroplane, then went to Italy via Belgrade. Ended up in France. Came to England to continue his fight against the Germans. With 303 Sqd (Polish) flying a Hurricane on the 6 September 1940 at 09:15hrs he was wounded after combat with a Bf 109 near Bexley. Baled out of Hurricane I (P3974) badly burned. Died Toronto, Canada.
Archiwum Database
42 KustrzyńskiZbigniewFg Off76718PAFPolish607 Sqd

303 Sqd Polish

Krzyz Walecznych

Medal Lotniczy (x3)

Wound Badge
HurricanePoW1996-09-09Escaped 1 February 1945. Died in Montreal Quebec Canada - ashes buried in a family grave in Poland 01.07
Archiwum Database

43 LewisAlbert Gerald 'Zulu'Plt OffSouth African616 Sqd

504 Sqd

85 Sqd

249 Sqd

AFC & Bar
Hurricane17WIA1990Radar operator in Blenheims with 25 Sqd in the Battle of Britain. Later rose to the rank of Group Captain. AFC and bar and Polar Medal and had the Lewis Chain of rocky features in Antarctica named in his honour. Born in May 1922, attended Warwick School. Joined the RAFVR as an Aircrafthand in February 1940. Just after the Battle of Britain he was promoted to Sergeant and flew his first Beaufighter sortie. He later served in North Africa and trained as a pilot in Canada. He was granted a permanent commission in 1947. From May 1955 Lewis led the RAF party with the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition, under the leadership of Vivian Fuchs, who would receive a Knighthood. Lewis left for the Antarctic in November 1955 and returned to the UK in March 1956. He returned to the Antarctic in November 1956 and finally came home in August 1958. He was responsible for the purchase of aircraft and spares, organising and running air surveys and providing close support for the expedition party in the field. In January 1958 Lewis became the first person to make a Trans-Antarctic flight in a single-engined aircraft. He flew from South Ice to Scott Base on the Ross Sea.

Flew with 616 Sqd at the outbreak of hostilities and then moved to 504 Sqd fighting in France. Then moved to 85 Sqd still in France where he claimed 9 kills. Stayed with 85 Sqd until August and shot down two more Germans. Then joined 249 Sqd. 27 September he claimed 6 kills, two probables and one damaged. Baled out of Hurricane I (V6617) badly burned on the 28 September 1940 over Faversham at 14:20hrs.


Dickie Lee and Albert Lewis, good friends on 85 Sqn until Lee went missing during the Battle of Britain. Albert Lewis went on to become a high scoring ace during the war. The drawing by Steve Teasdale has been signed in pencil by the artist and 23 veterans of the Battle of Britain. The signatures are: Roy McGowan, Bob Doe, Wilf Sizer, Len Davies, Bob Foster, Vivian Snell, Terry Clark, Ken Lusty, Ken Wilkinson, Tom Neil, Jack Toombs, Albert Gregory, John Ellacombe, Robert Haylock, Ken Lee, Nigel Rose, Basil Stapleton, Jocelyn Millard, Arthur Piper, CE Smith, Keith Aldridge, Ben Bent and Bill Green. (Courtesy battleofbritainbooks.co.uk


Portrait by Eric Kennington
44 McCollJohn BrianPlt OffC/1172RCAFCanadian615 Sqd

607 Sqd

1Survived war1982Born Waterdown, Ontario, Canada. Joined the RCAF on 1st October 1939. He arrived in Britain from Canada on 20th September 1940 and went to 112 Sqd (RCAF) - holding unit to supply Canadian pilots to other squadrons. 21st September 1940 he and 8 other Canadian officers arrived at 6 OTU Sutton Bridge. Converting to Hurricanes McColl joined 615 Sqd at Prestwick on 5th October. Posted to 607 Sqd at Tangmere on the 9 October. Moved to 73 Sqd at Castle Camps on 5th November 1940 and left with it en route to the Middle East onboard the carrier HMS Furious on the 10th and flew off to Takoradi on the 29 Novemeber 1940 flyinng to Heliopolis, via Lagos, Accra, Kano, Maidugari, Khartoum, Wadi Halfa and Abu Sueir. Attached to 274 Sqd in the Western Desert in December. 4th February 1941 McColl shot down a Caproni 133. Posted back to the UK on 31st March 1941, joined 401 Sqd (RCAF) on 28th June. Moved to 403 Sqd (RCAF) on 12th November 1941. 28th September 1944 he was serving with 416 Sqd (RCAF) and damaged a Me262 near Nijmegen. RCAF Reserve on 26th February 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant. He died in 1982.

Paradie Canadian Archive Database


45 McGregorGordon Roy 'Gordie'Flt LtC/936Canadian1 Sqd (RCAF)

OBE

DFC

Croix de Guerre

Czech War Cross

Order of Orange-Nassau (Holland)

Hurricane5Possibly the oldest RCAF pilot to see service. With 1 Sqd (RCAF) during the Battle. 38 years old. Shot down 4 during the Battle. DFC 25 October 1940. Commanded the Squadron from November before going to 2 Sqd (RCAF) /402 Sqd as the CO in January 1941. F/L V.B.Corbett took over when he became the commander of the Canadian Wing in April. Flew last operational sortie as a Group Captain on 28 March 1945, destroying a locomotive. Croix de Guerre in 1947 and the Czech Military Cross. After the war became President of Air Canada.

46 McKnightWilliam Lidstone 'Willie'Plt Off (later F/O)41937RAFCanadian242 Sqd

DFC & Bar
Hurricane17MIA1941-01-12 Age 22Born in Edmonton, Alberta 1918, he was a medical student before joining the RAF on a short service commission in 1939. On 6 November he joined 242 Sqd. In the fighting over France in May and June 1940, on attachment with 607 and 615 Sqds and with 242, McKnight destroyed 11 enemy aircraft, probably destroyed another and damaged two more. Immediate DFC on 4 June. During the Battle of Britain, McKnight continued to be prolific in shooting down enemy aircraft. On 8 October he was awarded a bar to his DFC and, on 6 November, he was promoted to Flying Officer. McKnight was killed on 12 January 1941: in company with Pilot Officer M K Brown, on a Rhubarb operation [using cloud cover to fly at low level and seek targets of opportunity such as trains and troop concentrations]. They crossed the French coast near Gravelines and strafed enemy troops. As they turned to make a second attack, a Bf 109 was seen, at 500 feet. Brown attacked the troops but when he looked for McKnight, he had vanished. He did not return to base and either fell to the flak or the Bf 109.

Born Edmonton, Alberta, Canada in 1918. Commissioned in RAF in 1939. Posted to 615 Sqd in May 1940 in France. 19 May 1940 shot down his first. Transferred 242 Sqd and involved in fierce fighting over Dunkirk where he claimed 8 kills (possibly 10). DFC. On 30 August 1940 he shot down 3 Bf 110s. He had 4 more kills in September and a Bf 109 in November. Bar to his DFC. KIA 12 January 1941 in Hurricane I (P2961) by a Bf 109 on a fighter sweep over France.

Commissioned in RAF in 1939. Posted to 615 Sqd in May 1940 in France. 19 May 1940 shot down his first. Transferred 242 Sqd and involved in fierce fighting over Dunkirk where he claimed 8 kills (possibly 10). DFC. On 30 August 1940 he shot down 3 Bf 110s. He had 4 more kills in September and a Bf 109 in November. Bar to his DFC. KIA 12 January 1941 in Hurricane I (P2961) by a Bf 109 on a fighter sweep over France. Runnymede

Paradie Canadian Archive Database



Duxford, September 1940

47 McNabErnest ArchibaldSqd LdrC/134Canadian1 Sqd (RCAF) CO

OBE

DFC

Czech Military Cross

Hurricane7Canadian Commanding Officer on exchange attachment to the RAF when war started. Returned to Canada to take command of Sqd (RCAF) and returned to England with them. Flew occasionally with 111 Sqd while sharing their base at Croydon, to gain operational experience. Downed Do 215 on 15 August 1940 with 111. Once 1 Sqd (RCAF) was operational he shot down a further 6 planes. DFC 22 October 1940. November he returned to Canada. He was also awarded the Czech Military Cross.
48 MillardJocelyn George Power 'Joce'Plt Off83999British1 Sqd

242 Sqd

615 Sqd

Air Efficiency Award

HurricaneSurvived war10th May 2010Born 23 February 1915. Educated St. Edmunds College near Ware, Hertfordshire from 1928 to 1931. Joined RAFVR in August 1937 as an Airman u/t Pilot whilst working for the de Havilland Aircraft Company. Week-end flying training at No. 1 E&RFTS Hatfield. Called up on 1st September 1939, he had completed his Service Flying Training course and had a total of 275 flying hours. October posted to 12 EFTS Prestwick for a flying instructors course. He instructed at 9 EFTS Ansty from April 1940, later moving to 12 FTS Grantham. 24 August he commissioned and posted to No. 1 School of Army Co-operation at Old Sarum. Volunteered for Fighter Command. 6 OTU Sutton Bridge on 4th September 1940, converted to Hurricanes joined 1 Sqd at Wittering on the 21 September. To 242 Sqd at Coltishall on 17 October and then to 615 Sqd at Northolt on 3 November. Probable Me109 on a sweep over France on 24 February 1941. March 1941 to CFS Upavon for an instructors course and in mid-April joined the staff at RAF College FTS Cranwell. He left for Canada in mid-July and began instructing at 35 SFTS there in September 1941. Canada until mid-May 1944, serving as Flying Instructor, Flight Commander, Examining Officer and Squadron Commander. Returned to the UK and went to Technical Training Command, for flying and administrative duties. Released from the RAF in 1947 as a Squadron Leader.


Signed envelope


49 MolsonHartland de MontarvilleFg Off (RCAF)RCAFCanadian1 Sqd (RCAF)

Order of Canada

OBE

Order of Canada

Hurricane1WIADiedLanding accident on return from a sortie at Hornchurch on 18 August 1940, damaged Hurricane I (3757). Credited with damaging three aircraft before downing a He 111 on 11 September 1940. Shot down by fighters and baled out of Hurricane I (P3873) over Canterbury, wounded, on 5 October 1940. Molson returned to Canada early in 1941.
Paradie Archive Database
50 NelsonWilliam HenryFg Off (later Flt Lt)39675RAFAmerican74 Sqd
DFC
SpitfireMIA1940-11-01Born in Montreal, Canada 1917-04-02, son of Henry and Sarafina Nelson of 4885 Cote St, Catherine Rd. Educated at Baron Byng High and Strathcona Academy. Joined the RAF in 1937 after working his way to England. On September 8/9 1939 he took part as Captain of a bomber in the RAF’s earliest operation, with 8 Whitleys dropping leaflets in NW Germany. After other operations he also took part in raids on Sylt and over Dunkirk during the evacuation. DFC by the King at Buckingham Palace 1940-06-04. First Canadian Jew decorated in WW2. His citation read 'Nelson carried out many flights over enemy territory, always showing the greatest determination and courage. After one attack on Stavanger, Norway, he encountered a balloon barrage and sent a report to base HQ in time to warn following aircraft. He wrote home that “ I thank God that I shall be able to help to destroy the regime that persecutes the Jews…..” Volunteering for Fighter Command and returning before his leave expired, he flew Spitfires from Hornchurch with 74 Sqd , shooting down a Bf 109, Bf 110 and damaging another Bf 110 on August 11 1940 when he took on six Bf 109s singehanded; damaging a Do 17 on the 13 August and destroying three more Bf 109s on October 17, 27 and 29. Killed 1940-11-01 by a Bf 109 attack over Dover in Spitfire P7312 at 1400 hrs. and crashed into the Channel. Listed as missing on the 52nd RAF casualty list on Nov 14 1940 but officially presumed killed on May 26 1941. He was 23 years old, left a wife (Marjorie Isobel) and young son and his name is inscribed on the Runnymede memorial, panel 4.

51 NorthGeraldPlt Off83719RAFVRBritish257 Sqd

Hurricane1943-02-10Continued service as flight instructor in Canada. Bone War Cemetery Annaba, Algeria Age 22

52 OgilvieAlfred Keith 'Skeets'Plt OffCanadian609 Sqd

DFC
Spitfire1.5PoW1998 Ottawa CanadaBorn in Ottawa, Canada on September 14 1915. Short-service commission on August 11 1939. Arrived at Middle Wallop 20 August 1940, posted to 609 Sqd as a replacement for Mac D Goodwin. Destroyed Bf 109 and claiming the probable destruction of an Bf 110 on 7 September 1940, Spitfire I (N3280) suffered some damage in this combat and he returned to base with a damaged tail unit. 15 September shared in the destruction of the Dornier Do 17 with Sgt. R.T.Holmes of 504 Sqd which crashed on Victoria Railway Station. Probably destroyed Do 17 on 24 September. September 27 he shot down a Me 110 off Portland. Taken prisoner 4 July 1941 on Circus 32 escorting 12 Blenheims attacking the Khulman chemical works and the power station at Chocques, three miles west of Bethune. Shot down by Bf 109s and wounded in the arm and shoulder and baled out, landing in a field. DFC on July 1941. Retired from the RCAF on the 14 September 1962 and returned to Ottawa where he lived until passing away in 1998. See Paradie Archive Database



Paradie Canadian Archive Database

'Funny this was, although I worked in banking, I had applied to get into the RCAF but it appeared that they didn't want me. With the war just started in England, I felt that I had a chance over there. At the time the RAF were taking just about anybody they could get their hands on. They had a terrific shortage of pilots, I think half of the pilots were from the Commonwealth, a lot of us were Canadians. I applied, I got called up on a Monday, had the medical on Wednesday and sailed for England on the Friday. '



53 ReilleyHugh WilliamPlt Off43043RAFCanadian/American64 Sqd

66 Sqd

SpitfireKIA1940-10-17American born in Detroit, Michigan of an American father and Scottish mother. Before going to England and joining the RAF lived in London, Ontario, Canada and was considered a Canadian. Flew with 64 Sqd and 66 Sqd in Spitfires during the Battle of Britain. Shot down in Spitfire I (R6800) on 17 October 1940 by a Bf 109 of JG 51 flown by Oberst Werner Molders over Westerham Kent 15:25hrs. Spitfire crashed and burned out at Crockham Hall, Sevenoaks. Gravesend Cemetery Age 22

54 RicksLeo Patrick Vincent JohnSgtRAFCanadian235 Sqd

BlenheimSurvived warDied Ireland on 8th January 1985.Born on 20th December 1921 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. England in 1938 to join the Royal Navy but an eye defect made him unacceptable. Joined the RAF instead on 26th September 1938 as a Boy Entrant. Later an Airman u/t WOp/AG. Joined 235 Sqd on 24th April 1940 and served with it until 2nd February 1941 when he went to 3 (Coastal) OTU as an instructor. From 27th November 1941 until 15th May 1942 Ricks was serving with 2 AACU. He then went to 7 (Coastal) OTU until March 1943 when he joined 86 Sqd, a general reconnaissance unit. Ricks transferred to the RCAF on 14th February 1945 and returned to Canada, where he was commissioned. Retired from the RCAF in 1964 as a Flying Officer. He went to live in Ireland in January 1969
55 RobinsonDenis NormanSgt60515RAFVRBritish152 Sqd

Spitfire5Survived war28th July 2015Crashed Spitfire I (R6811) at Bestwell after combat with Bf 109s off Swanage 8 August 1940 at16:15hrs. The aircraft burned up but he escaped injury.

Born 24 June 1918 at Christchurch, Dorset England. Educated at the Stationers Company School at Hornsey, London. Joined RAFVR in March 1938 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Training at 21 E&RFTS Stapleford, 26 E&RFTS Oxford and 22 E&RFTS Cambridge. Posted to 152 Sqd at Acklington on 21 June 1940. He destroyed a Me109 on 25 July and destroyed another on 5th August. 15th August 1940 Me109 destroyed, on the 17 August a Ju87 and on 4 September a Ju88. On 26 September posted to CFS Upavon. 7 October instructing at 6 FTS Little Rissington. Commissioned in January 1941. On 17 November 1941 sent to instruct in Canada at 39 SFTS Swift Current then briefly at 35 SFTS North Battleford and finally at 32 OTU Patricia Bay until 19 June 1944 when he returned to the UK. Went to 109 OTU, Crosby on 27 August 1944 to convert to transport aircraft and on 1 March 1945 he was seconded to BOAC at Whitechurch. Released from the RAF in 1946, as a Flight Lieutenant. Joined BOAC, later British Caledonian and British Island Airways before retiring in 1978.

Denis Robinson: A Spitfire Pilot's Story


56 RofeBernard JohnPlt Off (later Flt Lt)40751RAFBritish25 Sqd

BlenheimKIA1942-01-12Sherwood Cemetery Canada Age 21. Son Of Captain Henry Bernard John Rofe, M.C., And Kathleen Mary Rofe, Of Douglas, Isle Of Man.
57 RóżyckiWładysławPlt Off (later Flt Lt)76762PAFPolish238 Sqd

306 Sqd

306 Polish Sqd

Virtuti Militari

DFC

Krzyz Walecznych (x3)

Medal Lotniczy (x3)

Hurricane4Died1970-08-08Reached England in January 1940. After training in 6 OTU, assigned to 238 Sqd RAF, with which he took part from 01.07.-31.10.1940 active in the Battle. Then he flew in 306 Sqd Polish (1941) and 32 Sqd RAF (1943-1944). In 1945 transferred to 1 and 5 Ferry Unit. He died in Toronto ON Canada
Archiwum Database
58 RusselBlair Dalzell 'Dal'Fg Off (later W/C)C/1319RCAFCanadian1 Sqd (RCAF)

DSO

DFC & Bar

Croix de Guerre (France)

Order of Orange-Nassau (Holland)

Czech War Cross

Hurricane8DiedJoined up at the outbreak of war with No 1 Sqd RCAF. Destroyed eight aircraft before the end of September 1940. DFC 25 October 1940. Repatriated to Canada for most of 1941 and 1942. Returned to serve with a number of Canadian Squadrons. Bar to the DFC on the 16 November 1943. Dropped a rank to take command of a Squadron again, and on June 10 1944 flew to a forward airfield in France, becoming the first Spitfire to land in France after the invasion. DSO 3 October 1944.
Paradie Archive Database
59 SawiczTadeusz WładysławFg OffP-0596PAFPolish303 Sqd Polish

Virtuti Militari

DFC

DFC USA

Krzyz Walecznych (x4)

Medal Lotniczy (x4)

HurricaneDied2011-10-19Last living Polish pilot participating in Battle of Britain. In 2006 promoted by President of Poland to rank of Brigade General. Died in Toronto, Canada,
Archiwum Database

60 SharmanHerbert RonaldPlt Off78257British248 Sqd

AFC

BlenheimBorn in Wood Green, London 1907-10-22. Educated at Trinity County School. Joined the RAFVR in 1939, commissioned in March 1940 and fought throughout the Battle. He then trained in Canada and returned to the UK in 1943 as an instructor in navigation. With 297 Sqd he flew Whiteleys inserting agents into occupied Europe, and then flew VIPs to summit meetings in Casablanca, Tehran and Yalta. From March 1944 he undertook other VIP flights in the Far East and was awarded the AFC 1945-09-07.
61 SmytheDerek Myles AltamontFg Off79196South African98 Sqd

264 Sqd

223 Sqd

515 Sqd

Defiant

Wikipedia discussion of Defiant tactics
Survived warDecember 1999 Sleaford EnglandDFC London Gazette 14 November 1944. The original recommendation for the non-immediate award of the DFC. - by Acting Wing Commander Kenneth Frederick Mackie, DFC. & Bar, Officer Commanding, 223 Squadron - states: ‘Flight Lieutenant Smythe has now completed 160 operational sorties, totalling 334 operational hours during two operational tours of flying. In practice, this has been over one long operational tour, instead of two, as he has had no rest period since he started operational flying in November, 1940. Between November, 1940 and December, 1943, Flight Lieutenant Smythe carried out 113 operational sorties on Defiant night fighters with Fighter Command in the United Kingdom, and in January of this year flew out to Italy, joining No. 223 Squadron as my own gunner on Baltimore aircraft on 20 January, 1944. During the six months he has flown with me he had continual stomach trouble of varying intensity, but, in spite of this, he refused to go into hospital or to miss a single raid. He has flown with me as Leading Gunner of Squadron formations on 33 occasions and of Second boxes on seven, during a long period of strain and a change-over of Observer and W/Op. Air members of my crew. He has been Gunnery Leader of this Squadron during this period and by his drive, sound knowledge and experience with Fighter Command, has commanded the respect of the other Gunners and had contributed to a marked degree towards their efficiency and high morale. Although we have not encountered any enemy fighter opposition, as Leading Gunner he has directed me in evasive action against often severe Ack-Ack fire with such coolness and skill that no aircraft has been lost when he has been Leading. By his personal example and continuous strict supervision of the gunnery side of this Unit, he has been an inspiration and asset to all the aircrew. Strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross for determination and devotion to duty over a very long period of operational flying.’

The covering remarks by the Air Officer Commanding, No. 3 Wing, S.A.A.F., Lieutenant-Colonel O. Galgut, state: ‘Although Flight Lieutenant Smythe has only completed 47 sorties whilst with No. 223 Squadron, he previously completed 113 sorties in the United Kingdom. During his period of service with No. 223 Squadron he flew as Leading Gunner on 33 occasions. He showed keenness, enthusiasm and devotion to duty far beyond average and the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross is strongly recommended.’ Derek Myles Altamont Smythe was born on 26 June 1914 at Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa, the son of John James Robert Smythe and Ethel Mary Sophy Grayson; he was the husband of Julia J. O’Sullivan whom he married in June 1935 at Battersea, London. Smythe joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve on a direct-entry commission as an Air Gunner on 20 April 1940 and carried out his gunnery training at No. 1 Air Armament School at Manby, completing the Air Gunner’s Course there on 12 June 1940. Having been graded a ‘proficient Air Gunner’ on Battles, Demon and Blenheim aircraft, Smythe was appointed Acting Pilot Officer and posted on 20 May 1940 to ‘B’ Flight of No. 98 Squadron, equipped with the single-engine Fairey Battle light bomber. His first operational flight took place that same day, when acting as rear gunner to Pilot Officer Shuttleworth flying out of Nantes Aerodrome. That afternoon he flew in Battle K9219 piloted by Sergeant Leslie Charles Allton, a pilot who died over Maidstone during the Battle of Britain, not through enemy action but most likely through oxygen failure - his Spitfire being seen to fall out of formation and enter a spiral dive. Smythe flew on six more occasions from the training establishment at Nantes, but the success of the German Blitzkrieg and rapid retreat of the British Army towards the beaches of Dunkirk led to the evacuation of the Squadron. On 1 June 1940 Smythe flew across the Channel and likely witnessed the stream of Royal Navy, Merchant Navy and ‘little ships’ craft engaged in Operation Dynamo; among those who would never return home were 75 men of No. 98 Squadron, R.A.F., who died when H.M.T. Lancastria was bombed and sunk off the French port of St. Nazaire by Ju. 88s of Kampfgeschwader 30 on the afternoon of 17 June 1940. Many of those who weren’t drowned within the holds when the ship went down were killed when ‘German aircraft began strafing survivors in the water and dropped flares into the floating oil’ (The Sinking of the “Lancastria”: Britain’s greatest maritime disaster and Churchill’s cover-up, refers). On 18 June 1940, Smythe was posted to No. 5 O.T.U. at Ashton Down. It was here that he received further trainning as an Air Gunner, firstly on Blenheims and latterly, from 30 June 1940 on the Boulton Paul Defiant interceptor aircraft. Known affectionately by its aircrew as ‘The Daffy’, the Defiant looked similar to a Hurricane and used the same Rolls Royce Merlin engine, but there the similarities ended. With an air speed more than 100 miles per hour slower than a Me. 109, and with no forward firing guns, rather a reliance upon an an electrically operated ‘ball turret’ located behind the pilot, it was exceptionally vulnerable in daylight to enemy fighters. Furthermore, the Defiant had a blind spot beneath the tail – from where enemy fighters could deliver the coup de grace. Such weaknesses had been made clear in February 1940 when the Commanding Officer of No. 264 Squadron flew a Defiant on combat manoeuvres against Robert Stanford Tuck in a Spitfire; it soon became clear that against experienced opposition, the Defiant could only defend itself by circling and keeping its speed up, its abilities suited only to performing bomber-destroyer duties (Raymond Bowyer, refers). Nevertheless, Smythe was posted to No. 264 Squadron at R.A.F. Duxford under the command of Squadron Leader Philip Hunter on 6 July 1940. He joined ‘B’ Flight on a sortie with Pilot Officer Hugh Percy on 13 July 1940, and flew an interception patrol in low cloud and heavy rain over Orford Ness two days later. On 19 July 1940, Percy and Smyth patrolled over Harwich; at about noon, just a few days after the commencement of the Battle of Britain, nine Defiants of No. 141 Squadron took off from Hawkinge on a routine patrol, most of them crewed by crewed by New Zealanders. Flying at 5,000 feet, they were ‘bounced’ by a vastly superior force of Me. 109s who came out of the sun. Of the nine Defiants, four crashed into the Channel killing their eight crew, a fifth crashed into the White Cliffs of Dover and a sixth crashed trying to return to base. The scale of the mauling led to media coverage being hushed-up for the sake of national security and morale, but secret reports described it as a ‘massacre’. As a result, all 1,000 Defiant aircraft were later transferred from day to night-flying duty. This may explain No. 141 Squadron’s Latin motto ‘Caedimus Noctu’ (We Slay by Night), which gained relevance not at formation on 1 January 1918 and during home service in the latter stages of the Great War, but following the events that day. On 23 July 1940, the Squadron moved to Kirton Lindsey where they received a visit by Winston Churchill and Marshal of the R.A.F, Sir Cyril Newall. The experienced aircrews furthermore used this time as an opportunity to perfect a technique called the ‘Luftberry’, which enabled them to repel the faster enemy fighters by conducting a complicated manoevre involving forming quickly into a circle and descending, so that the Messerchmitt’s could not fly in front or beneath them. On 6 and 7 August 1940, Percy and Smythe conducted convoy patrols. On 11 August 1940 they were scrambled to intercept a Ju. 88 over Ringway, but could not catch up with the enemy bomber. Further convoy patrols followed, but with no contacts being made. Transferred to Hornchurch on 21 August 1940, Smythe flew on a patrol over R.A.F. Manston three days later, just 30 minutes after the airfield had been on the receiving end of a substantial raid by Ju, 88s and Me 109s. A series of individual combats were taking place overhead, but despite their eagerness Smythe was made to remark in his log book, ‘Numerous He 113s attacked but they would not engage’. That morning No. 264 Squadron claimed three Ju. 88s destroyed, one damaged and one He. 113 destroyed, for the loss of four Defiants in action and a further two lost in a collision on take-off. After a hurried lunch the Squadron were ordered up to meet another attack, and it was on this occasion that the Commanding Officer, Squadron Leader Philip Hunter, D.S.O., was last seen chasing an enemy bomber out to sea (The Few: The Story of the Battle of Britain in the Words of the Pilots, refers). Exactly why the Defiants of No. 264 Squadron were sent up in force on this day has never been fully explained, as it was only a month previously that No. 141 Squadron had been decimated, and by the end of the day No. 264 had lost six aircraft. Similar heavy losses sustained whilst engaged on patrol duties forced Fighter Command to allocate No. 264 Squadron a purely night-fighter role from 27 August 1940, with the occasional cover of convoys in the Channel. Percy and Smythe flew their first operational night patrol on 7 September, being engaged for a number of days in patrolling the skies above Northolt at 15,000 feet. On 20 September, Percy and Smythe lost R/T contact 30 minutes into their patrol and became lost, only finding their way back to base ‘by absolute fluke’ (his Log Book, refers); they continued regular patrols, before Smythe was posted to the Central Gunner School at Warmwell from 12 December 1940-5 January 1941. On 17 January 1941 Smythe returned to ‘B’ Flight with No. 264 Squadron, now operating out of Biggin Hill. Seving on his first night patrol in Defiant P 3313 with Flying Officer Percy on 15 February 1941, Smythe noted in his logbook ‘chased invisible bandit half way across Channel’. On 23 February he added on a similar patrol, ‘sat over Boulogne at 22,000 feet, getting pasted by our bombers’. In March and April, Smythe and Percy flew regular night patrols from Biggin Hill and West Malling, Smythe noting in his log the ‘bad Blitz on London’. In July 1941 they conducted a ‘Turbinlite-Havoc’ operation, where a Douglas Havoc night-fighter equipped with a searchlight in its nose attempted to illuminate the enemy bombers, hopefully to be shot down by the Defiants. Five more similar patrols were conducted in August. It was whilst flying over Dungeness in Kent that Smythe experienced a close shave when his aircraft was mistakenly attacked by Spitfires on 5 April 1942. Promoted Flight Lieutenant on 14 May 1942, he transferred to No. 515 Squadron and was ordered on 26 September 1942 to R.A.F. Zeals in order to participate in any future attacks on the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau capital ships which were being repaired in the Baltic ports. Between January and July 1943 Smythe completed over 30 ‘Ops’ with No. 515 Squadron and was then posted to No. 307 Ferry Training Unit at R.A.F. Finmere, Buckinghamshire. Transferred to No. 223 Squadron on 20 January 1944, he later acted as Gunnery Leader operating Baltimore’s from Celone, Italy. His logbook details 47 operations, the majority of them involving missions to bomb factories, railheads, a railway tunnel to the west of Praetola and road junctions. On 31 March 1944 he bombed the San Benedetto railway and on 7 April 1944 he attacked the Papigno hydro-electric plant. Later targets included gun positions near Ponte Corvino and the Wharves at Ravenna – where his aircraft met heavy flak. On 12 August 1944, Smythe returned home from Pescara to Cairo and on to England via Malta, for a well-earned rest. Smythe saw out the end of the War attached to No. 45 Group Transport Command at Dorval, Canada, where he served as Group Accidents’ Investigator. He was released from the RAF in March 1946, his log book recording a total of 1055 hours’ flying time. He married for a second time in April 1952, living with his wife Patricia Day at 59 Ladbroke Grove, London, W.11


62 ŠtefanJan.Sgt (later P/O)787599 184904RAFVRCzech1 Sqd

65 Sqd

313 Sqd Czech

312 Sqd Czech

310 Sqd Czech

AFC

HurricaneDied1990-10-03Died Canada
63 TrevanaCharles WarrenFg OffRCAFCanadian1 Sqd (RCAF)

HurricaneSurvived war29th July 1998 in Victoria, British Columbia.Born 1918 Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Joined 120 Sqd RCAF Auxiliary December 1936 as an AC2 on general duties. Private Pilots Licence April 1937. Commissioned in the Auxiliary in July 1937, began flying Gypsy Moths, then Tiger Moths and at the summer camp he flew Westland Wapitis. On 5th June 1939 began full-time service with 120 Sqd, advanced flying training at Camp Borden. Joined 2 (Army Co-operation) Sqd at Ottawa on 2nd November 1939. Sailed from Halifax on 15th February 1940. At Old Sarum on the 25th, squadron was renumbered 110. 18th August posted to 5 OTU Aston Down. Converted to Hurricanes, joined No. 1 (RCAF) Squadron at Northolt on 1st September 1940. Left in early March 1941 to be Deputy CO of 403 Sqd, then forming at Baginton. Posted to Digby on 30th June 1941 to form and command 412 Sqd RCAF. Operational in September but after only three sweeps over France, he was posted away in November and sailed for Canada on 23rd December 1941. January 1942 went to Eastern Air Command RCAF to supervise fighter operations. Commanded 25 (RCAF) Squadron at Sydney, Nova Scotia on 13th May 1942 but having only four Hurricanes he said he no longer wished to command. Sent to BGS Paulson, Manitoba as a staff pilot. Retired on medical grounds on 9th October 1943 as an Acting Squadron Leader. (Some sources spell name Trevena )
Paradie Canadian Archive Database


64 TruemanAlec Albert GrayFg Off40766RAFCanadian253 Sqd

Hurricane0.5KIA1940-09-04 Age 26Shot down and killed over Kenley in Hurricanes I (V6638) on 4 September 1940. Whyteleafe St Luke Churchyard England

Born: 1914 in Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada. Canadian pilot’s licence in Ottawa. Joined the RAF on a short service commission in 1938. Completed his training at 6 Flying Training School at Netheravon in Wiltshire. Commissioned as an acting pilot officer on 7 May 1938 and confirmed as a pilot officer on 7 March 1939. Arriving back in England from Canada on 30 May 1939, ended up with 155 Sqd Bomber Command, based at Hemswell in Lincolnshire, on Handley Page Hampdens. There, during take-off on a training flight with a full bomb load, he made an error: 'Hemswell on 27/05/1940: 144 Squadron Hampden L4135 Coded PL-? The aircraft’s back broke when the pilot turned the aircraft sharply and braked harshly whilst taxiing with full bomb load at 1615hrs. Pilot P/O AAG Trueman and crew were unhurt.' Arrived at 6 Operational Training Unit, Sutton Bridge in Lincolnshire, on 24 June 1940 to convert onto Hurricanes. On 20 July he was posted to 253 Sqd at Turnhouse. In August 1940, 253 Sqd moved back to Kenley. On 2 September Alec was credited with damaging a Bf109. Two days later he was in combat over Kenley Airfield when he was shot down and killed by an enemy aircraft, his Hurricane V6638 crashing at Tudor Close, Banstead. He was 26; the day before his death he had been promoted to the rank of flying officer. Buried in St. Luke’s Churchyard, Whyteleafe, Surrey. Also commemorated on a family memorial in Pointe de Bute Cemetery in New Brunswick, Canada. In the final quarter of 1940 Ethel Trueman, Alec’s young wife, registered the births of twin sons, Alec A. G. and Michael G. G. Trueman. Ethel died on 10 June 2002 in Lincoln, aged 89.

KenleyRevival.org Bio



Trueman Road, Kenley

Pointe de Bute, Canada
65 TurnerPercival Stanley 'Stan'Fg OffRAFCanadian242 Sqd
DSO

DFC & Bar
Hurricane14DiedDied in Ottawa on 23 July 1985.Born in Ivybridge, Devon in 1913. Emigrated to Canada. Returned to England and joined the RAF on a short service commission. Autumn of 1939 posted 219 Sqd on Blenheims, but quickly converted to Hurricanes and joined 242 Sqd. Sent to France on 14 May 1940 attached to 607 Sqd. Moved to 615 Sqd on the 16th May. When the squadron returned to England on the 19th May, he rejoined 242. On 25 May he got two Bf 109s and probably another, on the 28th he got a Bf 109, on the 29th he probably got a Bf 109 and damaged another and on the 31st and 1 June he got two more and probably a third. 8 June, 242 Sqd went to France. Turner destroyed two Bf 109s on the 9th June. Rturned to the UK on the 16th. On 7 September, when 242 was part of the Duxford Wing under Douglas Bader, Turner damaged a Bf 109. On the 15th he was made ‘B’ Flight Commander, as an Acting Flight Lieutenant, and on that day he got two Do 17s and probably a Bf 109. DFC on 8 October. Added to his score in 1941. Bar to the DFC. Commanded No 145 Squadron before going on to staff duties. He then took command of the Canadian 411 Sqd. Commanded 249 Sqd in Malta. He was on HMS Coventry, acting as an observer, when it was attacked and set on fire by German bombers in the Mediterranean on 14 September 1942. The ship was scuttled. Further commands of squadrons and wings followed. DSO in May 1944. Returned to Canada in 1946 and served in the Royal Canadian Air Force until 1965. He holds the record of the most combat hours flown of any Canadian pilot

Paradiae Canadian Archive Database



66 WardWilliam BarlowSgt (later W/O)516760British604 Sqd

Blenheim1984Joined the RAF as an Aircrafthand 1933. Remustered as an Airman u/t Air Gunner and served in the Middle East from 28 January 1936 to 22 December 1938. Serving with 604 Sqd at Middle Wallop by 23 September 1940 as an Aircraftsman. He flew one operational sortie with the squadron, on 1 October, as a Sergeant. Some time after he was selected for pilot training in Canada on 2 July 1942, returning to the UK on 8 March 1943. By early 1944 was Warrant Officer with 76 Sqd on Halifaxes from Holme-on-Spalding Moor. Night of 28 - 29 January 1944 he was in command of Halifax Mk.V DK245 MP-G on a sortie to Berlin, his sixteenth. It crashed shortly after taking off and clipping a tree, cause unknown. Sgt. Gordon Channon and Sgt. Donald William Munson were killed and Ward was seriously injured. He was taken to RAF Northallerton Hospital.
67 WhittyWilliam Hubert RigbyFlt Lt90288British607 Sqd

DFC
HurricaneDiedCanada
68 ZatonskiAlexander RomanPlt Off (later F/O)43052RAFAmerican/Canadian79 Sqd

HurricaneWIAMIA1941-12-06Born on 1 November 1915 in Philadelphia USA. Arrived in England via Canada in 1939. Joined 79 Sqd on July 1940. Operations from Acklington as No 3 to his Flight Commander (E.J.Morris) on the 15 August 1940. On his way South on 28 August 1940 he was shot down in Hurricane I (P2718) and treated for burns at Hythe Small Arms School. After a period of convalescence, he rejoined 79 Sqd. Posted overseas and by the autumn of 1941 he was in the desert with 238 Sqd. After a battle with assorted Bf 109s and Macchi 202s over the Cyrenaican border on the morning of 6 December 1941, he was posted as missing and is known to have been buried by an army padre. Posted 'missing believed killed', his grave has not been found. El Alamein Memorial Column 241
69 ŻurakowskiJanusz 'Jan'Plt Off (later Sqd Lrd)76715PAFPolish234 Sqd

609 Sqd

Virtuti Militari

Krzyz Walecznych (x3)

Medal Lotniczy

Spitfire3Died2004-02-09Flew with 234 Squadron. Escaped injury when he crashed Spitfire I (N3239) on the Isle of Wight on 24 August 1940 at 16:40hrs. He had been shot down by a Bf 109. Also flew with 609 Squadron and 152 Sqd RAF. From June 5 to December 28, 1942, he was the commander of 316 Sqd. March 1944 to the School of Experimental Pilots. (Empire Test Pilot’s School). Then to Boscombe Down. Test pilot. at Gloster Aircraft Co. in Great Britain. In 1952 he went to Canada, became the head of pilots. at Avro Canada at Malton. On the AVRO-CP 100 jet passed sound barrier. He settled in Canada. - In recognition of his contribution to the Canadian aviation industry, he was admitted to the Canada’s Aviation Hall of Fame and in 1996 his image was placed on a 20-dollar commemorative coin commemorating the first flight crossing the sound barrier in Canada. Died in Canada Age 90
Archiwum Database


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